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Tunisia

How innovation is disrupting the energy industry – and what it means for the Middle East and North Africa

Reem Muhsin Yusuf's picture
Traffic Jam in Casablanca, Morocco - World Bank l Arne Hoel

We are currently witnessing shifts in major industries as a result of rapid technological innovation and industry interconnectivity. The amalgamation between transport and software, for example, has resulted in Google Maps, Waze and Uber, apps that we all interact with to move from point A to B.

Tunisia: the leaders of tomorrow also have something to say today

Sadok Ayari's picture
Youth Event

Like a poppy resisting the wind, Tunisia is resisting all efforts to drag the country down. The ability of this tiny country in the Middle East and North Africa region to face up to challenges has been  well known since ancient times. The secret to this resilience lies in both the nature of Tunisia’s men and women and their commitment to effecting the kind of change that continues to seize the attention of the world.

What are the prospects for economic growth in the Middle East and North Africa?

Shanta Devarajan's picture
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World Bank Chief Economist for the Middle East and North Africa, Shanta Devarajan discusses potential economic scenarios for the region.

Tunisian civil society: from revolutionaries to peace keepers

Donia Jemail's picture

Avenue Habib Bourguiba, Tunis. Nataliya Hora l Shutterstock

Who would have thought, on January 14th 2011, when the Tunisian people took to the streets shouting “Degage!”  or “Get out!” to former dictator Ben Ali’s regime, that they put  in motion a series of events that would lead to a group civil society organizations  winning  the  Nobel Peace Prize four years later. 

Conflict and development: the World Bank Group’s new strategy for the Middle East and North Africa region

Omer Karasapan's picture
Damascus,Syria - Volodymyr Borodin l Shutterstock.com

In February 2012, I wrote a blog about the relevance to the Arab revolutions that had swept the region of  the UN’s then recently unveiled “Resilient People, Resilient Planet: A Future worth Choosing,” which called for the eventual adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Now three and a half years later, at the United Nations General Assembly in New York last week, , world leaders endorsed the SDGs, an ambitious agenda that aims to end poverty, promote prosperity and protect the environment. 

Think regional, act local: a new approach for Maghreb countries

Marie Francoise Marie-Nelly's picture
 Pichugin Dmitry l Shutterstock.com

Every organization, no matter how large, needs to pause occasionally and take a good, hard look at itself. It is vital for measuring the gap between intention and achievement, and charting a new course. For the World Bank Group (WBG), this “hard look” took the form of a gathering for three days in Marrakech, Morocco where we listened to voices from the ground, debated and reached consensus on an action plan for a renewed path for the Maghreb Team.

Does legal aid reduce poverty?

Paul Prettitore's picture
 Emad Abd El Hady l World Bank

Last week I attended a gathering of legal aid providers, a somewhat informal group mostly from rich countries but with a slowly growing number of developing country participants. Legal aid services—covering public information and awareness, group and individual counseling, and representation by a lawyer—are generally delivered free of charge to the poor and vulnerable, so they can better understand their rights and the procedures to enforce them, and improve their access to formal justice sector services (those provided by courts, other dispute resolution bodies, and lawyers). 

Why Fatima had to lose her house

Wael Zakout's picture
 Sarah Al Bayya l World Bank

I’ve just returned from a mission to Palestine. During the visit, I met Fatima. She was happily married until last summer, when suddenly she lost everything. 

What is a university degree worth in the Arab world?

Christine Petré's picture
 Ramzi Maalouf

Graduation—a long-awaited day in most students' lives. Yet, according to Amir Fakih, himself a recent graduate from Lebanon’s Notre Dame University, a graduation ceremony also comes with grievances. To illustrate his perception of the future for Lebanon’s young university graduates, he decided to dress himself in his graduation gown doing low-income jobs. 

Early childhood education is not a luxury

Kamel Braham's picture
 Arne Hoel l World Bank

Observers of the educational landscape in the Maghreb countries are often left with the impression that early childhood education is more a luxury than a necessity. While child-care centers, kindergartens, and other preschool institutions are thriving in the big cities, backed by a private sector that is filling the void left by the public education system, the public preschool system continues to be neglected. In order to understand the importance of early childhood education, the status of universal education in the region needs to be examined a little more closely.

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