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Africa

A development lottery

Malawi is the latest country to set up a national sweepstake, aiming to use some of the proceeds to fund development projects, but do state lotteries really work?

That’s what the BBC is asking you. Doesn’t make sense to me.

I don’t know much about this, but this sounds like a terrible idea because:

Africa’s economic outlook

The OECD has released their African Economic Outlook 2005/2006. See the press release:

The African economy is expected to grow by 5.8 per cent this year and another 5.5 per cent next year. Oil-exporting countries are outpacing others by a substantial margin while other countries continue to face serious problems.

China and India’s impact on Africa

New from the OECD: The Rise of China and India - What's in it for Africa? By the end they lean towards the conclusion that the “Asian Drivers’ rise in the world economy are largely positive for Africa.” The real determinant will of course be the wisdom of future policy decisions - this is where we need to focus. See a short summary or this policy insight note.

Foreign investment in fragile states

There has been a tendency to conclude that the difficulties for poorer countries to join the ranks of countries able to attract and use nonextractive foreign direct investment for development must be staggering and in the case of tropical countries—including most of sub-Saharan Africa, Central America, and the Caribbean—may be almost impossible to overcome. But the evidence indicates otherwise. Two of the most prominent success stories in the literature on foreign direct investment and development are Mauritius and the Dominican Republic.

Investment climate facility for Africa

The IFC has announced a $30 million grant to the Investment Climate Facility for Africa - a new public-private partnership for improving the continent's business environment.

Update: more on the Investment Climate Facility for Africa.

Afrobarometer

Over the past half decade though, the folks at Afrobarometer, which is run by Michigan State University, the Institute for Democracy in South Africa, and the Centre for Democratic Development in Ghana, have done a series of fascinating surveys on what Africans feel about some of the biggest issues they face.


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