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Africa

Boosting demand for open aid data: lessons from Kenya’s e-ProMIS

Daniel Nogueira-Budny's picture

One journalist used it as a data source for a story on solar energy in Makueni County. Another accessed the data for inclusion in a piece on sanitary napkin distribution in East Pokot. Development partners reported relying on the data to coordinate specific activities in the Central Highlands of Kenya. And this is to say nothing of the government users of the data managed by the Electronic Project Monitoring Information System for the Government of Kenya (e-ProMIS), Kenya’s automated information management system on development projects funded by both domestic and foreign resources.
 

 

Digital Development into Practice: Co-Designing a Citizen Feedback Tool that Makes Sense

Samhir Vasdev's picture
In April the World Bank endorsed the Principles for Digital Development, signaling its intent to support the use of technologies in projects through human-centered, contextually appropriate, collaborative, safe, and sustainable design.
 
But what does this look like in practice? On the surface, projects that adopt the Digital Principles may not look so different from more conventional ICT4D efforts. Consider, for instance, a new participatory monitoring program in Maputo, the capital of Mozambique. MOPA invites citizens to report problems in the waste management services through a digital platform, relaying these problems via an open-source map for the city council to enlist microenterprises to collect the waste. 
Within a six-month pilot across four districts, over 900 problems were identified by trained monitors
This is far from the first community engagement and participatory monitoring program to use technologies aimed at reducing barriers for citizens to more directly inform anything, from budget allocation to policy options to service delivery. And like many other participatory engagement programs, MOPA faced a slew of familiar challenges that have caused other similar projects to stutter, including:

Globally, periods are causing girls to be absent from school

Oni Lusk-Stover's picture
Also available in: Español  |  Francais
Student at primary school in Freetown Sierra Leone. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank

A UNESCO report estimates that one in ten girls in Sub-Saharan Africa misses school during their menstrual cycle. By some estimates, this equals as much as twenty percent of a given school year.

Many girls drop out of school altogether once they begin menstruating. Should young women miss twenty percent of school days in a given year due to a lack of facilities or a lack of information or a lack of sanitary products?

More than a short-term escape: Sustainable empowerment solutions for girls and women in Zambia

Sarah Haddock's picture
In rural Zambia, women who live in poverty struggle every day to make ends meet and feed their families. In the words of one woman, “to tell the truth we are poor. Any money I make from piece work goes to buying relish, washing soap and bathing soap, I hardly have anything left for anything else...My husband doesn’t work apart from doing a little here and there in our farm, also (my) boy goes to school, so there are school fees to think of.”
 

A blueprint for better jobs in Kenya

Maria Laura Sanchez Puerta's picture
We recently completed a Jobs Diagnostic in Kenya to look at ways that the country can create better jobs, especially for young Kenyans. Skills development is fundamental to the transition to better jobs as we found that firm creation is low and that more productive firms do not create more jobs. This lack of growth of the more productive firms is the real challenge. Better, more productive, transformational jobs will be key helping the country meets its goals of Vision 2030.
 

Jobs challenges and opportunities in Sierra Leone - notes from the field

Ian Walker's picture
A key theme in this year’s IDA replenishment is the need to improve jobs through accelerated economic transformation. Generating more jobs and increasing productivity by creating stronger market linkages is a challenge everywhere in the developing world. But it is both particularly important and difficult in countries facing fragility. Sierra Leone had hardly emerged from the effects of a long civil war when the Ebola crisis struck. Around the same time, the commodity super cycle began winding down in 2014, negatively affecting revenues. The Jobs Group is working with the Government in Sierra Leone to meet this challenge. A team recently visited Sierra Leone to see how World Bank Group operations are helping and to find out what more can be done to improve the outlook for jobs in the country.
 

Disrupting malaria: How Fyodor Biotechnologies is changing the game

Efosa Ojomo's picture
In a recent blog post, I made the case that disruptive innovation is the most viable strategy for economic growth in Africa. The post generated many comments and conversations, with people asking exactly how it would work. Since then, I’ve been collecting examples of successful disruptive innovations in various industries; this time, I’m tackling health care.


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