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East Asia and Pacific

The silent majority in a globalized world

Are women as globalized as men? Daniel Altman provoked some gender-balanced debate by noting that 95% of the comments on his Managing Globalization blog are from men. The same is true on the PSD blog. Commenters write that women sometimes post as men in hopes of being taken more seriously. They also quibble about his implied definition of globalization. Those points aside, Dan raises an interesting question. A few of my unscientific reflections on "women's globalization" after the jump...

Beijing gussies up for South-South trade

All eyes are on China today as dozens of African heads of state descend on Beijing for the China-Africa summit. As always, the BBC has excellent coverage, including a photo spread of Beijing rolling out the red carpet. Podcast fans will enjoy NPR's Morning Report on the conference.

What is that wireless worth?

Casting a wide net, McKinsey estimates that the economic impact of wireless is up to 8% of a country's GDP. To unlock this value, they encourage wireless providers and/or regulators to lower the minimum (but not average) cost of owning a cell phone and push coverage into rural areas. This is from a recent whitepaper, Wireless Unbound, which they were kind enough to send me. Check here to find your way behind the firewall and read the whole thing.

Capturing Value contest winners

Through this seed funding we are hoping to break a chicken-and-egg situation where investors will not invest in emerging markets for lack of information, and research providers will not enter the market for lack of demand. The object of the competition is to lead the market and to provide tools to a mainstream investment audience.

Global Competitiveness Report's new methodology

As you've probably noticed, the World Economic Forum's Global Competitiveness Report 2006-2007 is out. Am I the only one who finds the ‘stages of economic growth’ component of the new methodology to be a bit odd? From Chapter 1.1 (emphasis mine):

Mexico's favorable investment climate

Forbes publisher Rich Karlgaard thinks it's time to invest in Mexico. He cites its solid economic performance (3.5% growth this year), favorable demographics (lots of brand-new workers), consumer credit growth of 400% since 2000 (signaling a healthy middle class, and room to grow in the stock market (currently trading at just 37% of GDP).


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