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Latin America & Caribbean

A Survey of ICT & Education in the Caribbean

Michael Trucano's picture

infoDev Caribbean surveyinfoDev has released its two-volume Survey of ICT & Education in the Caribbean.  This work, which includes an overview of regional trends and initiatives, as well as sixteen country reports, complements earlier work that infoDev did in Africa and that UNESCO released (way back in 2004) for the Asia-Pacific region.

This study finds that:

In general, the experiences and situations among the countries examined vary only within a limited range. Countries differ in terms of their goals for the introduction of ICT and in the pathways they have chosen to achieve those goals. And, certainly, some governments and some institutions have invested more, attempted more, and achieved more than others. However none of the countries included in the Survey have “lapped the field” by achieving either system-wide adoption of ICT or the ICT-supported transformation of teaching and learning.

The Use and Misuse of Computers in Education: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Colombia

Michael Trucano's picture

super random sampling or random supersampling? you be the judgeWorld Bank Economist Felipe Barrera-Osorio, working with Leigh Linden of Columbia University, has just published a very useful and rigorous study on the impact of ICT use in Colombia.

The Use and Misuse of Computers in Education: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Colombia (PDF) looked at  97 schools and 5,201 children over two years of participation in the Computers for Schools program.

While some readers may immediately latch onto the finding that the program "had little effect on students’ test scores", I found the potential explanation for this lack of positive impact to be even more valuable:

"The main reason for these results seems to be the failure to incorporate the computers into the educational process. Although the program increased the number of computers in the treatment schools and provided training to the teachers on how to use the computers in their classrooms, surveys of both teachers and students suggest that teachers did not incorporate the computers into their curriculum."

Regional Movements for Media Reform

Silvio Waisbord's picture

Much has been said lately about the prospects for global institutions to promote media democracy and good governance. The jury is still out, however. How can a diversity of trasnational actors, including intergovernment bodies, donors, UN agencies, civic groups and business, be effective? Are all actors equally positioned? If national governments retain power over key decisions shaping media environments, how do global actors manage to influence opportunities for media pluralism and participation?

Latin America offers an interesting petri dish to examine the germination of regional movements promoting media pluralism.

España aprueba plan de retorno de inmigrantes

Sonia Plaza's picture

Un plan de retorno voluntario de los inmigrantes legales que no tienen empleo ha sido aprobado el 19 de Setiembre del 2008  por el gobierno de España.  Se podrán acoger a esta nueva iniciativa los inmigrantes que no pertenezcan a la Unión Europea y que sus países hayan firmado convenios bilaterales con España en materia de portabilidad de seguridad social.  El programa esta dirigido para los inmigrantes de Marruecos, Ecuador, Perú, Colombia, Ucrania, Argentina, Republica Dominicana, Rusia, Uruguay, Brasil, Venezuela, Chile, Filipinas,

'The Price of Silence: The Growing Threat of Soft Censorship in Latin America'

Sina Odugbemi's picture

I was sent this report this week by one of my colleagues in the World Bank. It speaks for itself. And it reinforces the need for serious attention to be paid to the strengthening of the media as an institution of accountability in developing countries.  Here's the press release accompanying the report.


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