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Middle East and North Africa

Can teachers unions help improve the quality of education in the Arab world?

Kamel Braham's picture


In many countries in the Middle East and North Africa, and in fact around the world, teachers—who play a pivotal role in any effort to improve education quality—have not been officially represented in the design of key government programs aimed at education reform.

Can Tunisia become a hub for entrepreneurs?

Christine Petré's picture


Although Tunisia has made significant political progress since its 2011 revolution, in terms of the economy, development has stalled. Tunis-based writer, Christine Petré takes the pulse of entrepreneurship in this young democracy and finds that despite obstacles many would-be entrepreneurs remain positive.  

​Open skies over the Middle East

Russell Hillberry's picture
Thirty years ago, most international travel was routed through national “gateway” airports in cities like New York, London or Tokyo.  Someone travelling between secondary cities such as Atlanta and Manchester would typically make two plane changes en route.  Due in part to changes in international aviation policies, travelers from those same secondary cities now have direct flights to many more international locations.
 

How to Reverse the Post-Crisis Slowdown of Growth in Emerging Economies?

Aristomene Varoudakis's picture
Growth in emerging economies has slowed over the past three years, something being discussed with urgency at the G20 meetings in Istanbul, Turkey. Part of the slowdown is cyclical, but a significant part reflects sluggish potential growth. Using new empirical evidence, this column argues that ambitious structural reforms can fully offset the slowdown of potential growth in emerging economies. Reforms that remove barriers to open markets and improve access to finance play a key role in revitalizing total factor productivity growth and boosting private investment.

Yemen: Too much donor aid on paper, not enough in practice

Nabil Ali Shaiban's picture
 World Bank l Foad Al Harazi

It’s been four years since Yemen witnessed a popular revolt against corruption and injustice.  But Yemen has not stabilized since. Back in September 2012, hopes were high that Yemen was on the path to political transition. Aid by the international donor community poured in.  But today, Yemenis seem to have lost all hope in government or the impact donor aid could have to improve their prospects. 

Oil, Politics and Offshore Accounts

Catherine Bond's picture
 Gennadiy Kolodkin / World Bank

Do political institutions limit ‘rent-seeking’ (excessive profits free from competition) by political elites? Very much so, if they’re working properly, argue the four authors (Jørgen Juel Andersen, Niels Johannesen, David Dreyer Lassen, and Elena Paltseva) of ‘Petro Rents, Political Institutions, and Hidden Wealth: Evidence from Offshore Bank Accounts.’ Their paper examines unique public data—on bank deposits held in some of the world’s best-known tax havens—to establish whether oil, in particular, really is the ‘resource curse’ it is made out to be by a range of political scientists and development professionals. (Spoiler alert—the answer is ‘yes.’) 

Jobs Crisis in the Middle East & North Africa

Nigel Twose's picture

From 14 – 24 January, I visited Lebanon, the Palestinian territories and Tunisia. It is a region that has some of the greatest challenges when it comes to creating jobs. Finding solutions to the jobs crisis in the MENA region is key to solving many of the other issues that are holding back the region’s development.

 A furniture factory near Gaza City. Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank

Avoiding a Permanent Refugee Trap in Turkey

Omer Karasapan's picture


This blog was originally published on Future Development.

 
There are now some 9 million Syrian refugees and it is estimated that 5,000 additional refugees are created every day. Over 5 million Syrians reside in neighboring countries, principally Jordan (800,000), Lebanon (1.8 million) and Turkey (1.8 million). Europe and the West have been largely closed to these refugees with desperate boat journeys the stuff of daily news items. The crisis is not abating, and with 2 million refugees in Iraq the problem is expanding. What is clear is that many of these refugees are unlikely to be going home soon, if ever.

​Using open tools to create the digital map of Cairo’s public transit

Tatiana Peralta Quiros's picture
Follow the authors, Tatiana (@tatipq) and Diego (@canaless) on Twitter 

The first step in any transit planning process involves understanding the current supply and demand of transit services. In most of the countries where we work, understanding the supply of services is a messy, costly and lengthy process, since most cities have little knowledge of bus routes, services and operational schemes.
 
Having a digital map (GIS) and General Transit Feed Specifications (GTFS) details of a network allows a transit agency to do better service planning and monitoring, as well as provide information to its users. A traditional GIS software approach often requires a team of consultants and months of work.  Last month, however, we were presented with the challenge to use innovative tools do the same work in less than two weeks.
 
This was our first visit to Cairo, Egypt, and there we were tasked with the goal of mapping the city’s entire bus network (approximately 450 formal bus routes) in order to conduct an accessibility analysis with our new Accessibility Tool. At first hand this task seemed daunting, and a few days after arriving we were not certain that we could accomplish it in two weeks.
 
Before our trip, we had agreed on a somewhat flexible work plan, laying out an array of potential open-access, free tools that we could use depending on the scenarios we would encounter, mostly dependent on the availability of data.

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