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For the 5 Days of DM2009, 10 Months of Planning

Tom Grubisich's picture

The logistics for DM2009 were an intimidating challenge.  They involved a nearly five-day production where people, equipment, and props had to smoothly mesh for a combination program and event that would leave the finalists not only better prepared to develop their projects but also happy and content, even if they weren't in the winners' circle.  One of the leaders in putting all the pieces together was Vanya Candia of the World Bank Institute.  Here's how she confronted the challenge (with Spanish translation):


Los 5  días del evento de la Feria del Desarrollo requirió 10 meses de planificación La coordinación logística de la Feria del Desarrollo implica varios desafíos para los organizadores, se debe coordinar de manera exacta que la gente, el equipo y la utilería estén en el lugar apropiado en el momento apropiado con el fin de producir un buen evento, ayudar a los finalistas a desarrollar una buena presentación de sus proyectos y  lograr  una grata experiencia para ellos aunque no logren ser  ganadores. La persona responsable de unir estas piezas en términos de logística fue Vanya Candia del Instituto del Banco Mundial.   Preguntamos a Vanya como ella logro confrontar estos desafíos (incluimos traducción al Español):


Q.  When did you begin planning DM2009?
P. Cuando se comenzó con la planificación del DM2009?


A.   About 10 months ago.
R. Comenzamos con la planificación como hace 10 meses atrás.
 
Q. What were the major challenges, and how did you solve them?
P. Cuáles fueron los mayores retos y como los solucionaron?


A. This year it was a challenge to coordinate the interpretation services for several finalists from indigenous communities.  Another challenge was to define which device to use for promoting social media as a tool for engaging stakeholders. After researching and analyzing, we decided to go with Flip cams that are affordable and very easy to use. Let me tell you about another example of challenges in terms of logistics. At the end of the first day when all booths were set up we realized that the ones located under the Atrium balcony didn't have enough light in the afternoon so we had to find a solution, after coordinating with GSD [General Services Department of the World Bank], we managed to place light bulbs in each booth.

Quote of the Week

Antonio Lambino's picture

"There are three complementary models of behavior change implicit in many public health communication campaigns.  The individual effects model focuses on individuals as they improve their knowledge and attitudes and assumes that individual exposure to messages affects individual behavior.  The social diffusion model focuses on the process of change among social groups.  The institutional diffusion model focuses on the change in elite opinion, which is translated into institutional behavior, including policy changes, which in turn affect individual behavior. The models contrast the direct effects of seeing mass media materials... with the indirect effects of the social diffusion model, (wherein) discussion within a social network is stimulated by PSAs (public service announcements) or media coverage of an issue; that discussion may produce changed social norms about appropriate behavior, and affect the likelihood that each member of the social network will adopt the new behavior.  In the institutional diffusion model, media coverage of an issue may operate through either one or both of two mechanisms.  Media coverage may affect public norms that affect institutional behavior or policymaker actions, or media coverage may lead policymakers to think an issue an issue is important and requires action, regardless of whether public norms have actually changed."

- Prof. Robert C. Hornik (2002, pp.14-15)
Public Health Communication: Evidence for Behavior Change

Words That Echoed Across DM2009 Competition

Tom Grubisich's picture

“I came here thinking of my people.  I leave here thinking of our planet.”

That's how finalist winner Carlos Daniel Vecco Giove of Peru summed up what DM2009 meant for him.  (Vecco was honored for his proposal to aid the Amazonian indigenous populations in his country in adapting to rapid climate change.)

Vecco's stirring words echoed around the floor of the competition, on up to the podium during the Friday, Nov. 13, awards ceremony, where a rapt audience heard Warren Evans, Environment Director of the World Bank, say: "Let me share with you what I heard that one of our finalists who traveled here from far away said this week."

One way or another, the other finalists expressed the same thought -- if not in so many words, then in the potential for their projects to bring innovative but practical climate adaptation not only to their target community but to people and places across regions and countries...to the whole planet.

DM2009 Winners Face More Funding Hurdles

Tom Grubisich's picture

Development Marketplace awards to winners range up to $200,000 -- to cover what is called "early-stage" or seed development of projects.  But after that period -- usually one or two years -- any project, no matter how promising it looks, has to find new funding.

DM2009 juror Tran Triet of Vietnam, a DM2003 winner, talked about projects that seek to transform a community both environmentally and economically -- the ambitious aim of many of the DM proposals, winners and non-winners alike.  At the panel on "Taking an Idea to Scale," Dr. Tran said: "A long-term commitment is needed.  The social agenda takes time to happen.  The normal [Development Marketplace] funding cycle of one or two years would be too short to bring about changes."

Juror Fred Onduri, who is chair of the Least Developed Countries Expert Group with the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change as well as head of the Policy and Planning Department of the Ugandan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, says two years "is not enough."  He thinks the national governments of the countries where the winning projects would be developed should fund them in the out years.

Ideas, anyone?

Sponsors Who Made DM2009 Happen

Tom Grubisich's picture

Development Marketplace couldn't happen without its sponsors, who donated nearly $5 million for this year's event.  Here they are, from left, at the Friday morning awards ceremony -- William Ehlers, team leader of the Global Environment Facility; Elwyn Grainer-Jones of the International Fund for Agricultural Development; Danish Ambassador to the U.S. Friss Arne Petersen; Warren Evans, World Bank Environment Director; and Sanjay Pradhan, Vice President of the World Bank Institute.

Development Marketplace: 100 Ideas to Save the Planet

Kseniya Lvovsky's picture

In Peru, innovative forest fire management prevents the risk of more fires with rising temperatures. In Kenya, communities share experiences with multi-pronged approaches to managing climate risk, combining indigenous knowledge with modern technologies. In India, women and youth use reality-show methods to tell of climate options. In the Philippines, a mangrove restoration initiative helps improve livelihoods during storms now, and protects against longer-term climate change impacts. 

These are just some of the examples of the “100 ideas to save the planet” that I encountered as a juror for this year’s Development Marketplace, which focused on innovative solutions for climate change. Development Marketplace is an annual competitive grant program that identifies and funds innovative, early-stage development projects that have high potential for replication and development impact.

Of these one hundred great ideas, 26 winners were announced today in three categories—Resilience of Indigenous Peoples Communities to Climate Risks; Climate Risk Management with Multiple Benefits; and Climate Adaptation and Disaster Risk Management. Each winner receives a grant of up to $200,000 to implement their project over two years.

You can read more about the winners in these categories (and also about how this global competition works and who funds it) on the Development Marketplace website and follow the conversation on the Development Marketplace blog. For many of the winners, it was a long journey to Washington DC to compete for the grants. 

DM2009 Emcee: 'The Script Only Takes Me and the Group So Far'

Tom Grubisich's picture

One of DM2009's most important cogs is emcee Michael Ciszewski, a consultant at the World Bank who is an organization development specialist who's focus is working with teams.  On Thursday afternoon I caught up with Ciszewsk for this mini-interview:

Q. The finalists looked pretty intense at the opening session on Monday [photo below].  Wer
e they?
 
A. Everybody was uncertain and nervous.  Me included.  We were all starting out on a brand new journey, although most of the participants have been on their own absolutely incredible journeys.
 
Q. So your objective was to get them relaxed?


A. I'm probably intially thinking, I've got to get myself relaxed.  If I can do that, then they'll settle into the relaxed space they need to be in.

Q. What's your M.O.?

A. There's a huge amount of behind-the-scenes work to make this happen, and the DM2009 team has just been unbelievable, on call for 24 hours a day.  Despite all that preparation, when the lights go up, and I'm on the podium, the script only takes me and the group so far.  A big part of what makes this work is letting them have the space they need and want.  That's hard to do with 200 people in the room.  But what we've done is a pretty good job of allowing people to say what they want to say when they think it's time to say it.  I'm amazed and impressed how interactive the sessions have been, how willing the participants have been to be present in the room.

SEED Initiative Chief Visits DM2009, Sees Similarities

Tom Grubisich's picture

Helen Marquard, Executive Director of the SEED Initiative, is visiting Development Marketplace for the first time and is getting inspired by the sense of innovation at the event.  She posts:

There are many similarities between the Development Marketplace and the SEED winners. The SEED winners, the 2009 winner in fact we just announced Wednesday (Nov. 11), show how far you can take a good idea, an idea that does not only make business sense but also contributes to the environment and the community. With more ideas like these we can surely face the challenge of climate change. 

* * *

The SEED Initiative through a competition every year selects the most promising start-up social and environmental entrepreneurs around the globe.  These entrepreneurs are then provided not with money but also with locally tailored support and know-how, to meet their most urgent needs. SEED also introduces them to organisations and companies that could have an interest and assist in scaling up the enterprises. The lessons learned are then collected, analysed, and shared with other entrepreneurs to promote sustainable development more widely.
 

DM2009 Juror: 'I Would Give Them All a Thumbs Up'

Tom Grubisich's picture

Looking at the 11 finalist projects he was assisgned to evaluate, juror Fred Onduri says: "I am so impressed.  I would give them all a thumbs up. I wish they could all be winners."

Onduri, who is chair of the Least Developed Countries Expert Group with the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change as well as head of the Policy and Planning Department of the Ugandan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, is one of the 40 jurors who took a searching look at the 100 projects that were winnowed from the 1,750 applications proposing early-stage adaptation to climate change.  Their goal was to choose up to 25 winners.

Onduri said the winners would have a better chance of long-term success if they were incorporated in the national priorities of the governments of the countries where the projects would be undertaken.  "Their funding will carry them for about two years," Onduri said.  "That's not enough.  Sustainability is very critical."

He also said that the winning projects' chance of ultimate success would be improved if jurors could offers ways to improve the proposals, especially in closing what he called "the sustainability gap."

Onduri and his colleagues used five criteria in their evaluations:


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