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African Development Bank

​Integrating West African economies PPP-wise

François Bergere's picture
Photo: Wikimedia Commons

What do Benin, Niger, Guinea-Bissau, Togo and Mali have in common? Apart from being members of the eight-country strong West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA), they share a common status as low-income countries, faced with huge infrastructure needs and financing challenges.
 
Furthermore, they have decided that one way to address these challenges and sustain their economic growth was to promote public-private partnerships (PPPs) through a regional framework and strategy. This initiative is supported by the Public-Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility (PPIAF) for the World Bank, and Agence Française de Développement (AFD) and Expertise France on the French cooperation side.
 
Which is why — on July 2-3 in the midst of sweltering weather in the leafy  suburbs of Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso,  which  is also  home to  UEMOA headquarters — 20 or so experts and decision-makers attended a two-day seminar to discuss the framework and strategy. Beyond PPIAF and AFD, regional participants included representatives from the UEMOA Commission, the Regional PPP unit at the West African Development Bank (BOAD), the African Development Bank (AfDB), the African Legal Support Facility (ALSF), the Organization for Harmonization of Business Law in Africa (OHADA), and the Central Bank of West African States (BCEAO).
 
The issues we covered included the need to:

PPP Days Dispatch: Day Two

Tanya Scobie Oliveira's picture
The second half of the PPP Days conference in London was devoted to country presentations of priority PPP projects, and a few projects – those most likely to be brought to market in the next six to 12 months – were showcased in detail. It was an inspiring example of collaboration for the greater good, proving that PPPs’ potential is limited only by our imagination. (OK, and budgets. And elections. And good structuring. And the presence or absence of natural disasters. But it all starts with imagination and commitment.)
 
PPP Days participants also exchanged ideas today with people around the world who are engaged in the ongoing Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on public-private partnerships, via the first-ever PPP MOOC Google Hangout. This was an unprecedented opportunity for the over 23,000 people from more than 190 countries now taking the course to ask their most pressing PPP-related questions to officials and experts attending PPP Days – and for these officials and experts to learn from those in the field.

The PPP MOOC Google Hangout was facilitated by Laurence Carter, Senior Director of the World Bank Group’s PPP Group. Panelists included Julia Prescott, Chief Strategy Officer, Meridiam; Thomas Maier, Managing Director for Infrastructure, EBRD; and Pradeep Singh, CEO of the Mohali Campus and Deputy Dean of the Indian School of Business.
 
World Bank Group #PPPMOOC Google Hangout

PPP Days Dispatch: Day One

Tanya Scobie Oliveira's picture

As your PPP Days Rapporteur, I feel like I should start this dispatch by typing “Dateline: London” on a manual typewriter in a newsroom thick with cigarette smoke. Alas, I am hunting and pecking the tiny keyboard of my phone from Exchange Square, the immaculate, smoke-free home of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), our hosts for the PPP Days meeting.

Photo: (c)EBRD/Dermot Doorly

“Doing More, Doing Better” is PPP Days’ ambitious-sounding theme. The event’s creators convened the gathering to enhance the collaboration among multilateral development banks (MDBs) that is already strengthening the PPP marketplace. One of the best examples of this collaboration, the PPP Knowledge Lab, launched at the conference this morning. The PPP Knowledge Lab, now live at www.PPPknowledgelab.org, is an online “one-stop-shop” for everything PPP. It’s an important online resource that will continually be refreshed and expanded.

Just as the PPP Knowledge Lab gathers great ideas onto one platform, PPP Days has gathered experts and thinkers in one place. These two days are packed full with talks, presentations, panel sessions, and breakout sessions that chip away at one of the most challenging questions of our day: “What would it take to double the right private infrastructure investment in emerging markets?” 

Innovation and collaboration for rapid results in public procurement

Sarah Lavin's picture


The World Bank’s Governance Global Practice (GGP) is integrating its approach to address technical and political constraints to effective public procurement in Cameroon.
 
In efforts to boost efficiency and integrity in public spending, the Government of Cameroon created the Ministry of Public Procurement (MINMAP), the first of its kind in the world, to take responsibility for providing oversight to public contract procurement and management. It is also in charge of executing high value contracts on behalf of all sector ministries and designing public procurement policies and capacity development strategies in partnership with the pre-existing public procurement regulatory body (ARMP).

Weekly Wire: the Global Forum

Kalliope Kokolis's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

NDI
The NGO Corruption Fighters' Resource Book

"Corruption is a very big problem in many nations of the world-some would assert that it is becoming more extensive, and more areas of development activity are being affected.  Corruption is also becoming, de facto, an attack on governance as more and more of the rules under which nations are governed are breached with impunity.  Citizen engagement is very important in fighting corruption, and there are particular advantages in getting NGOs more involved in the fight. NGOs have limitations, but also great potential strengths, and these can be better realized through better project management."  READ MORE