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angel investing

An angel at the entrepreneur’s table

Oltac Unsal's picture


A culture of angel investment could help entrepreneurs in developing countries (Credit: infoDev)

Investors and ‘Africanists’ Wesley Lynch and Keet van Zyl, co-founders of AngelHub in South Africa had fascinating things to say about early-stage innovation financing during infoDev’s Global Forum on Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship in South Africa.  Not only did they help in selecting the most inspiring entrepreneurs for the Forum’s Dragons’ Den pitching contest, they were putting forward a lot of passion in explaining how a culture of angel investment for startups and fledging entrepreneurs could be established on the African continent.  As access to finance is noted often as the main problem for innovative startups, we should look seriously at models that show potential.

Angel Investors as Startup Enablers in the Developing World

Oltac Unsal's picture

A normative definition that I use as a recovering angel investor myself is that an angel investor actively helps a seed stage startup succeed with both mentorship and capital in exchange for those intangible benefits of mentorship and a return on investment.  In World Bank parlance, then, they automatically provide both investments and technical assistance with no agency costs; a great recipe for solving multiple problems (funding capacity, entrepreneurial capability and access to early stage finance) in a cost effective way. Knowing that 318,480 of them invested $22.5 billion on 66,230 ventures in the US and achieved 27% annual returns forms the basis of our hypothesis that angel investing could work well in the developing world.