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API

New Metadata Query Feature in DataBank

Paige Morency-Notario's picture

DataBank is a data retrieval, analysis, and visualization tool that allows users to create, save, and share custom charts, tables, and maps. We launched the tool two years ago and have been making improvements based on user feedback ever since. Last year we released a multilingual version of the tool, and today we're pleased to announce a new feature that allows users to query country, series, time, and footnote metadata.

What can DataBank do?

  • It enables users to easily create custom queries on data drawn from 52 databases
  • It lets users create and customize charts, tables, and maps
  • It makes it easy to select, save and share data and visualizations
  • It's available on both computers and mobile devices
  • DataBank and selected data are available in English, Spanish, French, Arabic, and Chinese
  • It now allows users to create custom metadata queries
  • Watch the tutorial and read the FAQs to learn more about the basics of DataBank 

Wbopendata Stata Module Upgrade

Joao Pedro Azevedo's picture

The wbopendata Stata module has been updated to Version 13. The module can now be installed or updated directly from Stata's Statistical Software Components (SSC) repository.

To install or update your current wbopendata Stata module, please type the below text in the Stata command line:

ssc install wbopendata, replace
 

New features in this release:
  • Updated list of indicators with more than 2,000 new indicators, making a total of 9,900 indicators available
  • A revised list of country and regional codes
  • Five newly added topics: climate change, external debt, gender, Millennium Development Goals, and trade
  • A fully redesigned help file
  • A revised error reporting structure to facilitate the identification of connection failures, in particular, timeout errors

Here's an example of a query error caused by an invalid indicator:

World Bank opens largest set of development data --for free and in several languages

Claudia Gabarain's picture

Big news: the World Bank has launched an open data site with more than 2,000 financial, business, health, economic and human development statistics. Until now, most of this had been available only to paying subscribers. Not only that, but the site and indicators are also available in French, Spanish, and Arabic --with 330 indicators initially, but set to grow.

New Google feature lets users quickly search World Bank development data

James I Davison's picture

If you haven’t already taken the time to do some development-related Googling after last week’s announcement that World Bank statistics are now available through the ubiquitous search engine’s public data tool, I’d suggest exploring the exciting new feature. Now, anyone can easily access 17 World Development Indicators by searching for them in Google. Give it a try by searching for the GDP of China or CO2 emissions of Indonesia or exports of Thailand – or another country and any of these indicators.

When you click on the search result, an interactive chart page shows you how the data have changed over time and allows you to compare to other countries (or the world). (You can also embed the chart, like the one below.) For example, take a look at how the GDP growth rate of China compares to Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines in the last 50 years.

To further explore the data, check out another nifty tool, also launched last week by the World Bank. DataFinder lets you research more about these development indicators and see how they look on an interactive map. Read more about DataFinder here.

An open discussion on improving access to development- and aid-related information: Friday, July 10

James I Davison's picture

A few months ago, the World Bank released a new programming interface (API) that allows for a new level of access to the institution’s data. It is just one example of how the World Bank and other organizations are relying on new technology and the internet to increase transparency and improve access to information and data.

On Friday at the World Bank headquarters in Washington, D.C., several organizations are hosting an open discussion on the topic of transparency and open access to information. The event, which is dubbed Open Development Camp, is also sponsored by AidInfo, Development Gateway, Forum One Communications, and USAID's Global Development Commons.

According to the event's webpage, spots are filled to attend the conference in person. But it only seems appropriate that anyone will be able to join the discussion through the this website or follow the conversation via Twitter through the #OpenDevCamp hashtag. Tune in starting around 9 a.m. (Washington, D.C. time).

(via Global Development Commons)

Open data: is it really worth it?

Sameer Vasta's picture

The launch of Data.gov last week brought back a slew of discussions on open data and the importance of opening up access to data for it to be used in new ways on the web.

One of the conversations that I haven't heard often, however, is about the true value of open data. I was talking to a friend of mine and we asked the question:


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