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Biocarbon Fund

Who are the barefoot solar sisters…and how can they help forest communities?

Ellysar Baroudy's picture
Africa jobs
Since 2008, the share of manufacturing in GDP across Africa has stagnated at around 10%, calling into question if African economies have undergone structural transformation vital to sustained economic growth. Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank

Over the past decade and a half, Sub-Saharan Africa has experienced rapid economic growth at an average annual rate of 5.5%. But since 2008, the share of manufacturing in GDP across the continent has stagnated at around 10%.  This calls into question as to whether African economies have undergone structural transformation – the reallocation of economic activity across broad sectors -- which is considered vital for sustained economic growth in the long-run.

Treading Water While Sea Levels Rise

Rachel Kyte's picture


Photo Credit: Tim Wang via Flickr Creative Commons

According to the World Bank Group’s Private Participation in Infrastructure (PPI) Database, an estimated 10-30% of global infrastructure projects with private-sector participation in low- and middle-income countries are unsolicited, meaning the proposal was submitted by a private sector entity without an explicit request from a government to do so. The considerable use of this alternative procurement method, where the private sector rather than the government takes the leading role in initiating and developing a project, raises important concerns for public infrastructure practitioners at both technical and political levels due to the nature of unsolicited proposals (USPs). USPs offer potential opportunities for governments, but experience shows they can introduce several challenges, such as diverting public resources away from the strategic plans of the government, failing to attract competition, and ultimately leading to opportunities for corruption.

On the passing of Wangari Maathai

Warren Evans's picture
«Чудо-сосна» – 250-летнее дерево, пережившее цунами 2011 года в Японии и сохраненное как памятник 19 000 жертв этого стихийного бедствия. (Фото из Wikimedia Commons)
«Чудо-сосна» – 250-летнее дерево, пережившее цунами 2011 года в Японии и сохраненное как памятник 19 000 жертв этого стихийного бедствия. (Фото из Wikimedia Commons)


Занимаясь вопросами управления риском стихийных бедствий, мы часто самым внимательным образом следим за последними достижениями науки и техники для более глубокого понимания рисков и оказания общинам помощи в подготовке к будущим бедствиям. Это – похвальные усилия, но, как я заметил, дошедшие до нас проницательные выводы наших предков также могут помочь нам предвидеть риски завтрашних бедствий.