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business environment

Online contest: pro-poor market-based strategies

Changemakers.net is hosting an exciting new online contest:

Ashoka's Full Economic Citizenship Initiative and Changemakers have launched a global search for innovative market-based strategies from both businesses and citizen sector organizations that improve the lives of low-income individuals in different parts of the world.

Connecting the Poor to Economic Growth: Eight Key Questions

Sarah Lucas and Peter Timmer offer eight questions to ask if you want to understand the connection between economic growth and poverty reduction. It does help if potential employers are legally allowed to give the excluded a try:

Fighting corruption: a series

Paul Onapa of Transparency International Uganda wants more focus on the supply of bribes - the private sector. No complaints here, but fans of Robert Klitgaard may recall his famous formula for corruption:

Corruption = monopoly - accountability + discretion

Local company moves production underseas

In an effort to revitalize the company after years of stagnant profits, BakeCo Inc., makers of Good Twist Pretzels and Fluffy Brand Cream Cakes, announced plans Monday to move their Newark-based production facility underseas.

This from the satirical magazine, The Onion. Of course, the new business environment is not without its hazards:

Remittances: a tool for reducing poverty

Remittances The poverty-reducing impact of remittances can be enhanced by policy changes in both the migrants’ countries of origin - mostly developing countries - and their new home countries.

Measuring indicators with impact

The Economist has a large and very interesting piece on the migration of World Bank thinking towards recognising that 'institutions' are important.

Part of the difficulty, as Dani Rodrik of Harvard University points out, is that typical measures capture institutional outcomes, not institutional forms. The “rule of law”, for example, measures how secure an investor feels about his property. It tells us little about precisely what makes him feel that way.

Red-tape makes UK restaurants better

Food2 In the latest issue of Forbes Richard Karlgaard lets us know that the word “entrepreneurs” comes from France. So perhaps fittingly the high levels of red-tape in France are to blame for the improved London dinning scene:


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