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Campaign Art

Campaign Art: "We’re the Superhumans" celebrates Paralympics

Roxanne Bauer's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Back in 2012, in the lead-up to the Summer Paralympic Games in London, the UK’s Channel 4 created a social ad, “Meet the Superhumans”, to raise awareness and understanding of disability in sport but also how truly impressive, stereotype-crushing and fun the Paralympics can be.  The ad was incredibly popular and the channel's live broadcast of the opening ceremony on the night of August 29, 2012, was watched by 11.8 million TV viewers - its largest audience in ten years. The campaign also successfully helped the London 2012 Paralympics become the first Paralympic Games to sell out. 
 
Thus, creating a follow-up ad for the 2016 Summer Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro Brazil was a daunting task. Yet, the sequel, “We’re the Superhumans” is one of the greatest possible sequels. It is three minutes of powerful, fun, and compelling brilliance. It features a range of people with disabilities playing musical instruments, taking part in a range of sporting events, and doing everyday activities like eating cereal or filling up the gas tank of a car to the tune of Sammy Davis Jr.’s 'Yes I Can'.

There are one-legged dancers and blind musicians as well as a rock climber with one arm, a rally driver who steers cars with his feet and children with prosthetic limbs playing football and bouncing on a trampoline.

The film acknowledges the challenges that disabled people face on a daily basis, but it also shows that disabled people are capable of doing both extraordinary and banal tasks as well as any able-bodied person could.
 

We're The Superhumans | Rio Paralympics 2016 Trailer

Source: Channel 4 (UK Paralympic Broadcaster)

Campaign Art: Spice Girls meet SDGs

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

A video went viral yesterday. You may have seen it. It is a remake of the famous 90’s girl-power song “Wannabe” by the Spice Girls. In the video, girls and women from different places of the world sing to the famous tune while showing signs and posters of what they “really really want” for girls.

This campaign has been put together by The Global Goals, an initiative that is working to raise awareness, popular support and global action for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The 17 SDGs were adopted by the United Nations in 2015, and each of the goals contain specific global targets to be achieved by 2030. Goal #5 is for gender equality and empowerment of all women and girls.
 
#WhatIReallyReallyWant
Source of video: The Global Goals

Campaign Art: Salvaging cars and saving lives

Davinia Levy's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

We all know that organ donations save lives. Some people have to wait months and years to receive the organ they need to stay alive. Sadly, some die before a compatible organ is found for them. According to the US Government, 22 people die each day waiting for an organ in that country alone. Globally, there are some countries that are very generous when it comes to organ donation. Argentina is not one of them.

A metaphor to view this issue is to compare the human body to car parts. If you think about it, in a way we all have a chassis (our skin, muscles and bones), a motor (our heart), we stay well-greased with oil (our blood), and our exhaust pipe is… well you can guess.

To incentivize organ donations in Argentina, a taxi company has been using donated car parts from a scrapyard to fix taxis in their fleet. In exchange, the taxis become visible awareness campaigns for the cause of organ donations.

CUCAIBA: Donor cars

Source: Ad Agency J. Walter Thompson Buenos Aires

Campaign Art: Dance lessons for scholarships

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Do you know how to dance? You may be one of those that have a natural instinct for rhythm and movement, or you may be one of those that need some lessons to just learn how to do the steps.

How about exchanging dance lessons for scholarships? The Juan Pablo Gutierrez Caceres Foundation in Colombia offers scholarships for post-graduate studies to Colombian students with limited resources. This foundation capitalized on the great dance skills of the people of the Chocó region in Colombia. They offer online dance classes for a fee, and the money is used for the scholarship program of the foundation in that region.
 
CHOCÓ TO DANCE

Source of video: MullenLoweSSP3

Campaign Art: Soap that helps early detection of cancer

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

If you think about your community (family, friends, colleagues, etc), you probably know someone who has or has had breast cancer. According to the World Cancer Research Fund International, in 2012, breast cancer was the second most common cancer, with about 1.7 million new cases registered.
 
The good news, if any, is that breast cancer has a very high survival rates (of over 90%) when detected and treated at an early stage. A good way to detect cancer early is to perform routine self-exams to search for any lumps or changes in the breast area. A recommended time to do these self-exams is when we are naked and alone – and these conditions are met when we are in the shower.

To incentivize self-exams amongst the local population in Puerto Rico, HIMA San Pablo – a network of hospitals – came up with this public health awareness campaign. They distributed soap with a reminder carved in each soap bar and with waterproof instructions to correctly perform self-examinations in the shower.
 
The Life Soap

Campaign art: Is slavery woven into your clothing?

Roxanne Bauer's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

The textile industry, in particular the manufacturing of apparel, has long been a key industry in South Asia.  It provides those with relatively low skills with job opportunities. It also has a unique ability to attract female workers; women’s share of total apparel employment is much higher than in other industries in nearly every country in the region. In recent years, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka have made substantial investments in world apparel trade. In 2012, for example, apparel represented 83% of Bangladeshi exports and 45% of Sri Lankan exports.

Nevertheless, the apparel industry in many locations is burdened with poor working conditions and hazardous, degrading policies that damage the environment.  The harsh conditions that many workers in the developing countries must face have been qualified as “slave labour” by The European Parliament.

The Behind the Seams initiative is a new campaign dedicated to improving the conditions of workers in the international fashion industry and to raising awareness about the environmental impact of the industry. Because bad conditions throughout the production of clothing has a greater impact than just the factory. They started with a clear idea: transparency is the first step to transform the industry. There should be no mystery as to who is making your clothes, and all aspects and impacts of a brand’s supply chain should be known and regulated.
 
There should be no mystery
Source: Behind the Seams

Campaign Art: Press Freedom

Davinia Levy's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Tuesday, May 3 is World Press Freedom Day. This day, which marks the anniversary of the Declaration of Windhoek, was established by the UN General Assembly in 1993. Since then, 3 May is celebrated worldwide as World Press Freedom Day.

This international day gives us an opportunity to assess the state of press freedom throughout the world. Since 2002, the organization Reporters without Borders (or RSF for its acronym in French), keeps and updates the World Press Freedom Index, which ranks 180 countries according to the level of freedom available to journalists. In the 2016 index, northern-European countries take the top 3 spots for highest freedom. You can see each country’s detailed score and full report by clicking on the country’s name. In aggregate terms, according to RSF, there has been a “deep and disturbing” decline in media freedom globally and regionally.

To highlight the connection between increased global attacks to journalists, while at the same time represent the power of information and free press, the association of Canadian Journalist for Free Expression created in 2014 the following posters.

          

Campaign Art: How Do You See Me?

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

The first ever World report on disability, produced jointly by World Health Organization and the World Bank in 2011, estimates that more than a billion people in the world today experience disability. In his foreword to the report, Professor Stephen Hawking wrote: “Disability need not be an obstacle to success.”

Despite Professor Hawking’s powerful words and individual example of success with a very debilitating disability, the report acknowledges that people with disabilities have generally poorer health, lower education achievements, fewer economic opportunities and higher rates of poverty than people without disabilities. This is largely due to the lack of services available to them and the many obstacles they face in their everyday lives, including prejudice and stigma from society.

When it comes to intellectual disabilities, persons afflicted with these conditions are more disadvantaged in many settings than those who experience physical or sensory impairments, according to the report. Particularly, people with Down syndrome suffer great discrimination and misunderstanding from the general public. And it is not a small group. According to the World Health Organization, the estimated incidence of Down syndrome is between 1 in 1,000 to 1 in 1,100 live births worldwide. 

In order to break stigma and barriers regarding this mental disability, an annual awareness day was established. March 21, 2016, was World Down Syndrome Day. In honor of this day, the advertisement agency Saatchi & Saatchi produced this powerful campaign on social perception of Down syndrome.
 
How Do You See Me?

Source: Saatchi & Saatchi
 

Campaign Art: Raising the Volume to Fight Tuberculosis

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Tuberculosis is the #1 infectious disease killer in the world.  It kills more people annually than HIV/AIDS. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria that most often affect the lungs. TB is spread from person to person through the air (coughing, sneezing, etc). Each year, almost 10 million people develop TB, at least 1 million of which are children.

Tuberculosis is curable and preventable. However, since it’s most affected areas are in developing countries, international assistance and action is critical to help control, contain and eliminate this disease.  To raise awareness about TB, especially its effect on children, the campaign “Louder than TB” produced this short - yet hard to watch - video:
 
Louder than TB

Source: TB Alliance
 

Campaign Art: Using the hot road to cook a meal

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

As per NASA’s definition, global warming is “the unusually rapid increase in Earth’s average surface temperature over the past century primarily due to the greenhouse gases released as people burn fossil fuels.” This increase in temperature has grown exponentially in recent times. According to a World Bank report, warming of close to 1.5°C above pre-industrial times is already locked into Earth’s atmospheric system by past and predicted greenhouse gas emissions.

This rise in temperatures is most notable in cities due to the so-called “urban heat island” effect. This is caused by the concentration of people, vehicles, buildings and machinery, all of which generate heat. However, the biggest contributor to the urban heat island effect is the replacement of plants by concrete, according to the Smithsonian’s article.

Deforestation and increased pollution have caused Paraguay’s capital Asunción to be recognized as the hottest city in the world. World Wildlife Fund had an interesting idea to raise awareness amongst Paraguayans about the dangerous effects of global warming. With a local chef, they organized an outdoor restaurant with a “Global Warming menu” cooked directly on the hot asphalt of the street.
 
WWF Global Warming Menu

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