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Charles Kenny

It's Bad News . . . Again

Shanthi Kalathil's picture

It happens so regularly, it's nearly clockwork: somebody looks up from news of the latest disaster and asks, "Where's the GOOD news?"

Charles Kenny asks this question of development coverage in his latest blog post for the Center for Global Development. There are several reasons why nobody knows about the tremendous progress being made in Africa, he and others argue: it's hard for the media to repeatedly report on disasters averted; tragedy sells; NGOs and aid agencies have an incentive to trumpet crises in order to keep international attention focused and money coming in.  But the costs of continuously negative coverage of development include deterred investment, dispirited local populations and aid fatigue among donor nations.

Television for a change (revolution in a box)

Michael Trucano's picture

public domain image of the Braun HF television from 1958 comes courtesy of Oliver Kurmis via Wikimedia CommonsA quick check of the user logs for the World Bank's EduTech blog shows that postings on the use of mobile phones in education consistently draw the most readers.  While highlighting the new and innovative appears to grab the attention of visitors, there is no denying the impact that 'old' technologies like radio and television continue to have on education around the world.  In an optimistic cover story in the most recent edition of Foreign Policy magazine, my World Bank colleague Charles Kenny makes the case in Revolution in a Box that, despite the recent hype around new Web 2.0 tools (like Twitter or Facebook), it is not the computer, but the TV that "can still save the world".