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Using Auctions to Keep Methane-Reduction Projects Running: An Interview with Vikram Widge

Isabel Hagbrink's picture
Gas flaring


Vikram Widge heads the World Bank Group’s Climate and Carbon Finance Unit. He spoke from the UN Climate Summit about the new Pilot Auction Facility for Methane and Climate Mitigation (PAF).
 
Q. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and the Swedish Energy Agency just pledged $15 million each for the design of a new facility called the Pilot Auction Facility for Methane and Climate Mitigation. What is the PAF?

The World Bank Group is designing a new climate finance pilot that will support emission reductions in developing countries. Because of limited public resources available for climate investment, this facility leverages private capital to support projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and are at risk of being decommissioned due to the low price for carbon credits today. 

The facility tests an innovative contract structure by offering put options through an auction to guarantee a minimum price for carbon credits that a project will generate, which gives private-sector buyers, such as projects developers and intermediaries, the security of knowing that they will be paid for investments they make to lower emissions.

Merkel: We Support a Price on Carbon – Growth & Climate Protection Can Go Hand in Hand

Angela Merkel's picture
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In a video shown at the UN Climate Leadership Summit on Sept. 23, 2014, German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks about her country's support for carbon pricing and how it can drive low-carbon growth. 

The Atmosphere at the People’s Climate March Is Electric

Rachel Kyte's picture
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The People's Climate March drew people from all over the world to New York City today, and you could feel the energy in the air. Across town, government ministers are beginning to feel the sense of urgency, too. 

It Takes All of Us: Stretching the Space for Political Agreement on Climate Action

Rachel Kyte's picture
 Connect4Climate

The rising level of anticipation around the UN Secretary-General’s call for climate leadership has been palpable over the past few weeks, and especially so here in New York at the People's Climate March today, with Climate Week about to start and the UN Climate Leadership Summit just two days away. 

At the World Bank Group, we have been fielding calls from our clients – companies and countries – who are asking for support and wanting to know how they can engage on the different climate initiatives that are coming together across all sectors of the economy. 

Standing in my daughter’s school yard talking to other parents last week, we discovered that many of us would be joining the march. In our family’s religious community, buses were organized and rooms offered to those headed to New York to add their voices to the call for action. New York is just one location – the march organizers are talking about more than 150 other climate action events around the world.

Before stepping off, let me try to lay out how I believe this Summit can help spur action and achieve the speed and scale of action we need. 

In Aspen, Bringing Climate & Energy Policy Back from Partisanship

Rachel Kyte's picture
 National Renewable Energy Laboratory engineer Tim Wendelin tests techniques for solar energy storage at a testing facility in Colorado. Dennis Schroeder / NREL
Photo: National Renewable Energy Laboratory engineer Tim Wendelin tests solar energy storage techniques at a facility in Colorado. Dennis Schroeder / NREL


In the rarified atmosphere of Aspen, Colorado, last week, I attended the 11th American Renewable Energy Day Summit. Over the years, the event has grown into a fascinating brainstorming and networking event bringing U.S. domestic and international figures in the renewable energy business together – financiers, technology entrepreneurs, government officials, activists, and scientists from across the energy challenges and opportunities.
 
We talked about international climate negotiations and renewable energy progress in China and India, but the strongest focus was on the challenges and great potential for U.S. innovation and how to bring climate change and energy policy back from partisanship.

Bhutan: Connectivity in the Cloud(s)

Charles Kunaka's picture

Bhutan has some of the most thrilling rides in the world—in the air and on the ground.
 
Flying into Paro Airport, the only international airport in Bhutan, is an experience like none other—its narrow runway tucked between rugged 18,000-foot peaks, high in the Himalayas. Below, the road between Thimphu, the capital, and the border city of Phuentsholing twists and turns as it navigates some of the world’s highest mountain passes, often blanketed in fog with visibility reduced to mere meters. On clear days, both offer some of the most stunning, breathtaking views you will ever see.
 
But stunning peaks do not make for easy trade routes, and this is a problem in Bhutan. That’s why the World Bank’s International Trade Unit teamed up with the South Asia Transport Unit to conduct a diagnostic of impediments to transport and trade facilitation in Bhutan.  The diagnostic, a prelude to a potential investment operation, was based on the recently released Trade and Transport Corridor Management Toolkit.
 

Bold Steps for China’s Cities

Sri Mulyani Indrawati's picture
Also available in: العربية  Español


Photo courtesy of Li Wenyong

 

In 2030, more than 300 million Chinese are expected to have moved into cities. By then, 70 percent will live in urban settings. Given China’s size, it will mean that one in six urban dwellers worldwide will be Chinese. The challenges coming with that demographic shift are already visible and well known, in China and beyond.

Urbanization is a global trend. So when we think about new approaches to urbanization here in China, we believe that they are of value for other countries facing similar issues. In other words, China’s success in urbanization could pave the way for global rethinking on how cities can be built to be healthy, efficient, and successful.

Needed: Pragmatic Energy Leadership for a Livable Future

Rachel Kyte's picture

Beijing Smog. Ilya Haykinson/Flickr Creative CommonsRight now, as you read this, wherever you are, we are in uncharted territory. Our global population of 7.1 billion is headed for more than 9 billion by 2050. With our growing numbers and aspirations for shared prosperity comes a growing demand for energy to power homes, businesses, industry and transport. Our continuing reliance on fossil fuels is generating pollution and a dangerously high amount of greenhouse gas emissions – this past summer, the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere passed levels not seen in 3 million years.

If you were in Beijing last week, you felt the impact in your lungs: Just 16 days into the new year, the city woke up to its first “airpocalypse” of 2014, the latest in a series of dangerously high smog days. Beijing’s mayor announced plans the same day to cut coal use by 2.6 million tons and ban heavily polluting vehicles.

That was an important local step, and we are seeing forward-thinking cities and national governments make similar moves as they develop the architecture for a cleaner, low-carbon future.

YouThink! Year in Review

Ravi Kumar's picture
I'm amazed by how young people around the world are innovating despite the numerous challenges they face. Their participation in the fight against poverty is crucial. At the World Bank, we know we can't end extreme poverty by 2030 without empowering youth.

VP Rachel Kyte Welcomes UN Special Envoys on Climate Change

Climate Change Group's picture

World Bank Vice President for Sustainable Development Rachel Kyte issued the following statement welcoming the United Nations announcement today of two new UN special envoys on climate change: John A. Kufuor, who served as president of Ghana from 2001 to 2009 and chairperson of the African Union from 2007 to 2008, and Jens Stoltenberg, the prime minister of Norway from 2000 to 2001 and 2005 to 2013.
 
"The appointment of President John A. Kufuor and former PM Jens Stoltenberg as the Special Envoys on Climate Change by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is a crucial step to mobilize political will in advance of the UN 2014 Climate Summit. At the World Bank Group we are working with countries to increase ambition and take climate action by highlighting their opportunities for action that build growth, jobs, and resilience. We are delighted to support the Special Envoys, who will be critical to meeting the climate challenge."


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