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Climate Change

The Global Compacts and Environmental Drivers of Migration

Susan Martin's picture
The Global Compacts on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and on Refugees hold the potential for addressing the causes of and improving responses to migration, displacement and relocation across borders as a result of sudden- and slow-onset natural disasters, environmental degradation, and the adverse effects of climate change. The compacts reference and, in the case of the migration compact, provide specific commitments to address the drivers of environmental mobility and to develop policies aimed at ensuring greater protection for those affected by these movements.

No place for pessimists at Cape Town adaptation gathering

Raúl Alfaro-Pelico's picture



As I join my colleagues this week in Cape Town (South Africa), to exchange positive experiences on climate resilience at the 2018 Adaptation Futures Conference, I could be somber. The world’s premier knowledge event related to adaptation is taking place in a city coping with its worst drought ever. Signs at the airport, throughout the city and the hotel warn: “Don’t Waste a Drop!”, “Every Drop Counts” or simply “Save Water.” 

Completing the storytelling ‘circle’: a VR project goes home

Tom Perry's picture
Development organizations & NGOs need powerful stories to help people connect with their work. Yet how do communities feel after their stories have been shared?

After leading the production of a climate change Virtual Reality production in Fiji and returning it to communities, Tom Perry, the World Bank's Team Leader for Pacific Communications, shares his thoughts.

An optimist’s view on climate-smart infrastructure

Vasuki Shastry's picture


Photo: RoyBuri | Pixabay

In developed countries, we tend to take infrastructure services for granted. It’s easy to forget, when living in London, Washington, or Singapore, how much lies behind the simple act of switching on the lights. But as a young person growing up in India in the 1960s, I knew what it was like to live with rampant electricity shortages and terrible roads. It was easy to complain about it, and we did. It seemed, then, that the solution was simple: government should simply cough up the money, get to work, and build the infrastructure.
 
But there was a lot more we didn’t think about. Behind good infrastructure systems lie much more than concrete, pipes and wires. There are other building blocks as well, such as sound policy, good regulations, viable institutions, and fruitful interactions between the public and private sectors.

Fossil fuel subsidy reforms: we know why, the question is how

Jun Erik Rentschler's picture
A new book, “Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reforms: A Guide to Economic and Political Complexity (Routledge), explores the complex economics and politics of fossil fuel subsidies, and distils key principles for designing and implementing of effective reforms. Here are some key insights.

Strong measures: getting fiscal on climate change

Weijen Leow's picture
Opening plenary of the Africa Carbon Forum



Albert Einstein once said: “The only source of knowledge is experience.” For years I have wondered about this. Surely you can understand something without actually having done it. After all, mankind’s understanding of the vast universe is greater than what can be directly experienced, and some of it is derived from theoretical reasoning. I was on my way to the 2018 Africa Carbon Forum to share fiscal policy lessons under the CAPE program and the debate was still raging in my head when I arrived at the UN campus in Nairobi Kenya.

Finance ministers should step up efforts for climate action

Petteri Orpo's picture
Photo: Mariano Mantel/Flickr

By Petteri Orpo, Minister for Finance, Finland 

Climate change already has many negative impacts with wide-ranging effects. According to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), global warming is significantly slowing economic growth in African countries while the population is growing rapidly. Climate change increases poverty and conflicts, as well as migration pressure.

It’s time to act. In terms of scale, the solution to the climate crisis is an exceptional challenge in the history of humankind. Emissions must be reduced quickly in all sectors of the economy.

Using adaptive social protection to cope with crisis and build resilience

Michal Rutkowski's picture
In a world increasingly filled with risk, social protection systems help individuals and families cope with civil war, natural disaster, displacement, and other shocks. ©
 Farhana Asnap/World Bank


Crisis is becoming a new normal in the world today. Over the past 30 years, the world has lost more than 2.5 million people and almost $4 trillion to natural disasters. In 2017 alone, adverse natural events resulted in global losses of about $330 billion, making last year the costliest ever in terms of global weather-related disasters. Climate change, demographic shifts, and other global trends may also create fragility risks. Currently, conflicts drive 80 percent of all humanitarian needs and the share of the extreme poor living in conflict-affected situations is expected to rise to more than 60 percent by 2030.


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