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Climate Change

Are we prepared? The case of the disappearing fish

Rasmus Heltberg's picture

"Spectacular achievements are always preceded by unspectacular preparation." (Roger Staubach)

Warming of the oceans is one of the best known facts about global climate change. Ocean warming is already happening and is not subject to great uncertainty of predictions as far as I understand. So, is the world prepared to deal with warmer waters?

Collaborative climate change website targets both experts, average folks

James I Davison's picture

Wikipedia, the collaborative encyclopedia website, has interestingly turned the concept of wiki sites into something that seems to be a relatively accepted and trustworthy source of information.

An interesting new wiki tool called Climate Lab takes this concept one step further. The people behind the site, which was beta-launched last week, hope that it will serve as both a clearinghouse source of information for the general public, as well as a collaborative and knowledge-sharing tool for experts of issues related to climate change.

Disaster Risk Management and Climate Adaptation (part 2)

Abhas Jha's picture

Part 2 of 2.

I work on disaster risk management in East Asia and the Pacific. This is a region which faces increased disaster risk associated with climatic hazards, particularly from rising sea-levels, exposure to floods, droughts and tropical cyclones. Some scientists claim that for some islands in the Pacific it may already be too late. Adaptation may mean moving out to another country. The major challenge that we face is to shift the focus of attention and resources from post-disaster reconstruction to pre-disaster risk reduction and to integrate the disaster and climate change adaptation agendas across different levels and sectors of governance and the involvement of a broad range of stakeholders.

Disaster Risk Management and Climate Adaptation

Abhas Jha's picture

I grew up in a small town in India-Patna-beside one of the mightiest river systems in the world, the Ganges. It is hard to describe the sacred place that the river has in Indian daily life. From sprinkling the holy water on a new born baby to putting a few drops into the mouth of someone about to die to dissolving the ashes of the dead into her deep embrace, the Ganges is like a mother to most Indians (literally she is often referred to as Ganga Maiya or Mother Ganges). But she can be a tough disciplinarian as well. Growing up next to her teaches you a profound respect for nature and the havoc she can cause. Patna is the capital of the state of Bihar which is one of the poorest states in India. One of the primary reasons for the poverty of the state is the almost annual havoc caused by the flooding of the Ganges and her tributaries in which thousands of lives and billions of rupees are lost. I remember as a little boy waking up in fear late one night  hearing government jeeps warning everyone to get out of the way-the river was about to break over its embankments and flood the town.

Business Plan Competition to Promote Biogas Development

Aaron Leonard's picture

The Appropriate Infrastructure Development Group (AIDG) is sponsoring a business plan competition to promote biogas development in Northern Haiti. The winning proposal can win up to US$50,000 in grants and early-stage financing. The DEADLINE is THIS FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009. For more information, click here or visit the AIDG website at www.aidg.org.

Comparing the fuel efficiency of planes, trains, automobiles – and cheeseburgers?

James I Davison's picture

After East Asia & Pacific on the rise blogger and World Bank conservationist Tony Whitten recently questioned the morality of jetting off to Asia so often for work, this chart from GOOD Magazine – comparing (sort of) the efficiency of different modes of transportation – caught my eye.

Since the people who made the chart are considering gallons of fuel used per passenger to travel a long distance, Tony’s frequently used airplanes are far from being the worst offenders on the list, which is led by gas-guzzling SUVs and cruise ships. When it comes to realistically traveling 350 miles, your most efficient choices – in the following order, according to this chart – are to travel by bus, train, or (you guessed it) airplane.

If that doesn't cut it for you, however, and you are feeling particularly energetic, they made a conversion to human energy. In such a case, GOOD estimates, a person would have to consume approximately 16 Whoppers to complete the trip by bike and 48 of the mouth-watering cheeseburgers to trek the distance on foot (To be safe, I'll take a similar stance as GOOD in "neither endorsing or denouncing the consumption of Whoppers").

As an aside, I would have liked to figure out how many of the burgers it would take to fuel the number of air miles logged by World Bank Group's Washington, DC, staff (as Tony discovered, it equals at least 400 million miles each year) – were they to travel by foot. But seeing as my math skills were never too great, maybe one of you, dear readers, can help me figure out their equation?

(hat tip to FlowingData)

The Power of a Powerful Network

Zeeshan Suhail's picture

Many people ask me how to get involved in international organizations like the UN, the World Bank and other large NGOs, and my answer is simple - networking!

Networking has become a buzzword in recent years and grown in popularity as an effective way of getting jobs in the West, but what countless people dont realize is that networking is an art; it's a process. Relationships must be cultivated and then sustained when one networks. The concept is simple, yet its practice is difficult.


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