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corruption

Chinese corruption portal launched

China's discipline watchdog announced… the opening of a website facilitating the public reporting of corruption.

Thanks to CIPE Blog for the pointer. Here is the site (I think?).

Aceh Diary: Price distortions

There are two prices in Banda Aceh—the price charged to locals, and that reserved for foreigners. Or as some around here put it the “blue-eyed price” and the “brown-eyed price."

I had heard before coming out that Banda is something of a bubble economy these days from all the local and international organizations and NGOs falling over each other in a rush to spend the big bucks. I didn’t realize then to what extent that’s true, and how much it’s distorting the local economy and perceptions of the people as to the budget limitations some organizations, including IFC, have.

Global fraud on the rise

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ 2005 Global Economic Crime Survey is out. They report that 45% of the companies in their 34-country study reported falling victim to fraud in the past two years. See the press release or individual country reports.

Raghu Rajan on aid and growth

Raghuram Rajan writes on Aid and Growth: The Policy Challenge in Finance and Development. He remains sceptical:

Unfortunately, I'm not sure that even if each micro-intervention works well by itself, they will all work well together. Interventions could affect each other and get in each other's way or vie for the same resources. They could also have adverse spillover effects on the rest of the economy.

Somalia’s resolve

To move cash the few score miles between Mogadishu, Somalia's lawless official capital, and Jowhar, the seat of its transitional government, a local money-vendor has to pay $6,000. For that he gets an armoured lorry, 30 gunmen and three “technicals” — jeeps with heavy machineguns. What he doesn't get is insurance or any recourse to a state authority if his gunmen are killed, for state authority does not exist. But the money vendor still moves the cash, if the amount is big enough, and still makes a profit.

African bloggers find their voice

Until recently, blogging - the practice of keeping a journal style website with dated entries - has barely registered in sub-Saharan Africa, with switched-on South Africa as the obvious exception. The relative scarcity of affordable internet access and the physical distance from the Western epicentre of the online world made blogging an elite pastime for expatriates living in the continent and Diaspora students outside it. But the situation is starting to change…


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