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Uncanny resemblance: Greedy bankers and critics of PPPs

Michael Klein's picture
Normally critics of the private sector like disparaging the greed of bankers. Many bankers in turn take a dim view of people who do not see the value of endeavors involving the profit motive. Yet, as the French say: “Les extremes se touchent” – sometimes extreme views have more in common than they care to admit.
 
In one such case, both bankers and critics of public-private partnerships (PPPs) are happily united in dumping risks on unsuspecting taxpayers – precisely the citizens whose interests they profess to serve. How so? 
 
Banks are unusual firms. They carry little equity relative to debt – often no more than five percent of total assets at best. Typical firms in other sectors would find such levels of equity positively dangerous. They often carry equity worth 50 percent of assets, many even more. 
 
Bankers say equity is expensive and debt cheap. Hence low leverage – little equity as a share of assets – makes sense. If that were it, firms other than banks would be fairly dim-witted. They should also load up on debt and thus lower costs. So why don’t they?

Until Subnational Debt Do Us Part

Otaviano Canuto's picture

Decentralization in many countries has given subnational governments certain spending responsibilities, revenue-raising authority, and the capacity to incur debt. Furthermore, rapid urbanization in developing countries is requiring large-scale infrastructure financing to help absorb influxes of rural populations. Not surprisingly, the subnational debt market in some developing countries has been going through a notable transformation.