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Service with a smile: A new growth engine for poor countries

Ejaz Ghani's picture

This post was originally published in Voxeu.org.

Services have long been the main source of growth in rich countries. We argue that services are now the main source of growth in poor countries as well. We present evidence that services may provide the easiest and fastest route out of poverty for many poor countries.

For more than 200 years, it was argued that economic development and growth was associated with growth of the labour-intensive manufacturing sector (Baumol 1967, Kaldor 1966, UNIDO 2009). Services were considered as menial, low-skilled, and low-innovation (McCredie and Bubner 2010). But today, services can be among the most dynamic sectors in an economy. The policy question is whether this is true even in poor countries.

KNOMAD launches international logo competition

Dilip Ratha's picture

Work on establishing the Global Knowledge Partnership on Migration and Development (KNOMAD) is going on at full speed. A key part of that work is to create a solid and strong identity for KNOMAD. However, instead of going the usual route of getting this done through a graphic design company, we are asking creative people throughout the world to design a logo for an institution whose work will, directly or indirectly, touch the lives of the world’s estimated 1 billion migrants.

So, do join us in this exciting process of creating KNOMAD’s identity. The KNOMAD International Logo Competition is open to people from anywhere in the world. There is no age restriction and participants can be individuals or companies or amateurs working as a team. The only requirement is your creativity. There’s a US$2,500 dollar cash award on offer for the winning design.

The competition closes on December 31 and we are looking forward to a truly global participation.

Related Resources:

Design Brief  | Rules | Competition Website
 

Follow on Twitter: #KNOMAD

CNBC-TV18 India talks to Kaushik Basu on Growth

LTD Editors's picture

Following is the trancscript of Kaushik Basu's interview with CNBC-TV18, India, which first appeared on www.moneycontrol.com.

In an interview to CNBC-TV18, Kaushik Basu, chief economist, World Bank said the growth situation has to be taken seriously. "I do believe that, for India, there has to be all focus on growth."

Despite the fact that compared to the rest of the world, India is doing well, he said, it has the potential to get right back to 8.5 percent growth. "We have to put all hands on growth and try to get it back again up as quickly as possible," he added.

Q: You have been appointed as World Bank’s chief economist. So, the view from the inside has now changed to the view from the outside, has not it?

A: A little bit. Three months ago, I moved from the heart of Indian policymaking to seeing it from outside.

Friday Roundup: Unemployment, Jobs, Sectors, and Rethinking Development

LTD Editors's picture

How do you measure unemployment? By counting the number of people looking for work but unable to find it. However, this measure overlooks people willing to work and not necessarily looking for jobs. In an interesting chart, The Economist illustrates how a broader measure makes unemployment in Europe look even worse
 

New journal: Migration and Development

Dilip Ratha's picture

It is a pleasure to receive the inaugural issue of a new journal Migration and Development published by Routledge. While many journals are publishing articles on migration and development and a few are exclusively dedicated to the topic of migration, this new journal has the potential to comprehensively introduce more development into the discussions of migration issues. The journal includes articles written bypolitical scientists, sociologists, anthropologists and economists - a welcome feature for policy makers and stakeholders. I also liked the fact that the first issue of the journal has articles on internal migration (in India) and on migration to the Gulf region - both these topics are important and yet relevant data are hard to come by.

How can the Knowledge Bank make development more effective?

Philip Keefer's picture

Like all other development agencies, the World Bank has few systematic ways to measure, track or even recognize the effectiveness of its work. Instead, stakeholders are more likely to insist on fiduciary oversight and lending volumes; management is more accountable for meeting lending targets and upholding administrative requirements than meeting development goals; and approvals of Bank projects and country partnership strategies – not surprisingly – are rarely based on explicit analyses of their development effectiveness.
 
None of this is new.  Enhancing “development effectiveness” emerged as a key concern in a recent review of the World Bank’s governance structure, for example, but similar concerns have been expressed at least since the Wapenhans Report twenty years ago. What is new is the energy surrounding current efforts to put development effectiveness at the center of Bank operations. But doing this means confronting the essential problem that there is no cookbook for development. Whether we care about “big” development – tripling incomes per capita in Malawi over the next 15 years – or “little” development – improving health outcomes for rural women in Orissa this year by expanding access to cooking stoves – some things we think work actually do work, at least under certain conditions; other things we only think work, when in fact we have no evidence either way; and we are fairly sure that even all the things we know (or suspect) work will only get us part-way towards our development goals.

Development Slogan Contest Allows Youth to Share Hope With the World

Ravi Kumar's picture

Available in Français, Español

Slogan Contest Japan
Mayu Muto, left, receives the Grand Prize for the 3rd Annual Development Slogan Contest from Kazushige Taniguchi, Special Representative of the World Bank in Tokyo.

“We will not let poverty hamper your future.”

That’s the English translation of Mayu Muto’s grand-prize winning entry in the third Development Slogan Contest sponsored by the Tokyo office of the World Bank.

Maya believes poverty should not dictate anyne’s future. She gave an inspiring speech in Japanese on Saturday early afternoon as she received her prize from Kazushige Taniguchi, Special Representative of the World Bank, along with three other Excellence Award winners of the third Development Slogan Contest. The contest is held every year in Tokyo to deepen understanding about development issues among Japanese youth.

Jim Yong Kim Opening Press Conference at Annual Meetings 2012

Maureen Hoch's picture

As the 2012 Annual Meetings opened Thursday, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim held a press briefing and fielded questions on a range of topics including the role of emerging economies, food prices, climate change, and more.

Read a full transcript of Dr. Kim's press conference, view photos and watch a video report below.

Follow the Annual Meetings on World Bank Live and on hashtag #wblive.


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