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economic outlook

The outlook for Sub-Saharan Africa in five charts: Striving for recovery

Gerard Kambou's picture

The global economic recovery will see economic conditions improving in Sub-Saharan Africa. Activity is projected to pick up across the region over the forecast horizon, helped by firming commodity prices and gradually strengthening domestic demand. However, in the absence of reforms, potential growth is expected to remain low given demographic and investment trends, weighing on per capita incomes and diminishing the prospects for poverty reduction. Downside risks predominate, including the possibilities that commodity prices could remain weak, global financing conditions could tighten in a disorderly fashion, and that regional political uncertainty and security tensions could intensify. On the upside, a stronger-than-expected pickup in global activity could further boost exports, investment, and growth in the region.
 
Sub-Saharan Africa’s growth outlook is improving 

Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is projected to pick up to 3.2 percent this year from an estimated 2.4 percent in 2017 and 1.3 percent in 2016, and strengthen gradually. While Angola, Nigeria, and South Africa – the region’s largest economies — will struggle to boost growth, the performance of the rest of the region will be stronger.   
 
Growth

Source: World Bank
Note: shaded areas represent forecasts

Weekly wire: The global forum

Roxanne Bauer's picture

World of NewsThese are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Views on National Economies Mixed as Many Countries Continue to Struggle
Pew Research Center

Almost a decade after the global financial crisis rattled national economies, many in the world feel their respective countries’ economies remain weak. A new Pew Research Center survey reveals a bleak picture in parts of Europe, with more than eight-in-ten in Greece, France and Spain describing their country’s economic situation as bad. This gloom is not shared by all in the European Union, however – most Swedes, Germans and Dutch say their economy is doing well. And in China, India and Australia, views are mostly positive. Just three of the 12 nations for which trends are available have seen an increase of public confidence in their national economy in the past year. This mirrors the International Monetary Fund’s projection that 2016’s global growth will be modest and fragile.

Predicting The Break: How Nations Can Get Ahead Of The Next Refugee Crisis
Co.exist

Europe's leaders were so caught off guard by the refugee crisis when it first erupted in 2014 that the German city of Cologne—overwhelmed by the number of asylum-seekers that November—bought a luxury tourist hotel for $7 million to house some of them. It would only get worse. The whole of Europe, in fact, was shell-shocked (and who wouldn't be at the sight of Aylan Kurdi?). The big question now, for governments, migrations researchers, and analysts, is: Can we do better next time?

Weekly Wire: The Global Forum

Roxanne Bauer's picture
These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.
 

How mobile phones can save, not waste, energy
World Economic Forum
The mobile industry is experiencing explosive growth worldwide, fuelled by almost 7 billion subscribers and an ever-growing demand for data traffic. However, the energy efficiency of mobile networks remains extremely low. Both base stations and smartphones regularly waste 70% of the energy consumed as heat. The underlying power architecture used in mobile communications still relies on outdated technology developed during the 1930s. The impact of relying on such outdated technology is huge.

U.N. Predicts New Global Population Boom
MIT Technology Review
A new analysis suggests that the world’s population will keep rising through 2100, and not flatten around 2050 as has been widely assumed. Such an increase would have huge implications, but the prediction’s reliability is debatable, given that it does not take into account future hardships a large population would likely face.  According to the new analysis by researchers at the United Nations and several academic institutions, there is an 80 percent chance that the world’s population, now 7.2 billion, won’t stop at nine billion in 2050, but will instead be between 9.6 billion and 12.3 billion by 2100.