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financial crisis

From Collapse to Recovery: Latin America and Caribbean rebound from crisis

Carlos Molina's picture

With the global economic crisis in the rearview mirror, Latin American economies are on a fast track to full recovery and will post a solid 4 percent growth for 2010.

This is no small feat, says the Bank’s chief regional economist Augusto de la Torre, in his new report on the region’s economic prospects ‘From Collapse to Recovery’ (pdf). The region’s rebound, he explains, is one of the world’s strongest, second only to Asia’s, which is the main engine pushing global economies towards a full-fledged recovery.

Spring meetings for the rest of us

Ryan Hahn's picture

Haven't received your all-access pass to the World Bank Group's spring meetings? You can still get a taste of the action. Danny Leipziger, a former Vice President of the World Bank and now a professor at George Washington University, is leveraging off the meetings to organize an event taking place this Monday at the George Washington University.

Your questions about East Asia and Pacific's economies, answered by World Bank experts

Claudia Gabarain's picture

Ivailo Izvorski, the Lead Economist for the East Asia & Pacific region of the World Bank (and our latest blogger, below this post), and Vikram Nehru, Chief Economist for the region, held a live online chat a couple of days ago where they answered a good number of questions about China's currency, GDP forecasts, free-trade agreements, and structural reforms, among others.

Burnishing a tarnished brand

Ryan Hahn's picture

No, I'm not referring to Tiger Woods's recent return to golf. George Soros is trying to rebuild the economics profession from the ground up at the Institute for New Economic Thinking. The site has a ton of interesting videos, including the one below by Nobel laureate George Akerlof (of The Market for Lemons fame).

Why Global Coordination is Falling Short and Why We Should Be Worried

Merrell Tuck-Primdahl's picture

Lackluster global coordination, relatively weak international responses to the worldwide financial crisis, persistent problems of over-capacity, and the likely decimation of peasant agriculture in countries with huge populations to feed are all factors largely overlooked by most economists and policymakers. Giving these issues short shrift could ultimately lead us into a double dip recession, warned a diverse panel of experts who spoke on March 25 at Columbia University.

The Wisdom of Jacques Necker: A Note on "The Road from Ruin"

Sina Odugbemi's picture

If there is one historical personage that all finance ministers – or treasury secretaries – need to know, he is Jacques Necker (1732-1804). He was the finance minister of France in the 1780s. He was credited with popularizing the phrase ‘public opinion’ (opinion publique). What was his central insight? He noticed that the attitude of the French public to the king of France determined whether or not they purchased the treasury bills issued from time to time by the king. It they had a favorable opinion of the king they bought his bills; if not, they did not buy his bills. In other words, the financial health of the kingdom and the power of the king depended on opinion publique.

Necker pointed out that the same was true of the finance minister. He was clear that the finance minister ‘stands in most need of the good opinion of the people.’ He pointed out that fiscal policies needed to be pursued with ‘frankness and publicity,’ and that the finance minister must ‘associate the nation’ with his plans, including the obstacles he had to surmount.  Necker practiced what he preached, launching a systematic management of public opinion.  In 1792, he declared:

PPP Financing: Moving towards a "new normal"?

Editor's Note: Clive Harris is Manager of the Public-Private Partnerships program at the World Bank Institute. This is the first in a series of posts on PPP Days 2010, taking place March 22nd and 23rd at the headquarters of the Asian Development Bank in Manila.


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