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Fiscal transparency

Stretching the Frontiers on Fiscal Openness Initiatives

Massimo Mastruzzi's picture

The recent Open Government Partnership (OGP) regional events in  Bali and Dublin have provided a fertile opportunity for participating countries to showcase their performance in advancing open data reforms and for newer members to learn from their peers. The positive energy and participation at these events was a reminder of the strides achieved in recognizing the importance of open data as a precondition for better development outcomes. This was particularly relevant in the field of fiscal openness where an increasing number of countries demonstrated how they are taking actions towards improving transparency in financial matters.

The fiscal openness working group (FOWG) - a partnership between the Global Initiative on Fiscal Transparency (GIFT), the OGP Secretariat and the Governments of Brazil and Philippines - – provided a good opportunity to review the results achieved so far. It produced a background paper that reviewed the status of fiscal commitments. The following highlights stood out in helping us gauge the extent to which fiscal transparency principles are being operationalized in the OGP context:

Is Technology Sufficient for Fiscal Transparency & Openness? Lessons from East Asia and North Africa

Tina George Karippacheril's picture

A Warli Tribal Painting by Jivya Soma MasheWe are curating a monthly series on Digital Gov. in developing countries. The series seeks fresh perspectives and insights into the policy, institutional and technical dimensions of technology and public management, in understanding how public services are modernized, organized and delivered to citizens and, in supporting openness and public accountability. In the fourth post of the series, we reflect on Fiscal Transparency and Openness in light of the upcoming Asia-Pacific Regional Open Government Partnership Conference, focusing on developments in major middle income countries in East Asia and North Africa.

Do governments report on where the money goes?

Cem Dener's picture

The discussions on budget transparency and open data have been gaining momentum over recent years. Not only is it important that governments publish budget data on web sites, but also that they disclose meaningful data and full picture of financial activities to the public. The question is, how much of the disclosed information and documents are reliable? What is the scope of disclosed information? Is there any reliable information about other important aspects of fiscal discipline and transparency?

A number of fiscal transparency instruments and guidelines have been developed by civil society groups and international organizations to evaluate the existence, regularity, and contents of certain key budget documents published in the public domain and whether the information comply with international standards. However, current instruments do not concentrate on the source and reliability of published information, as well as the integrity of underlying systems and databases from which governments extract data.

Multistakeholder Mid-Life Crisis? - Time for a support group

Michael Jarvis's picture

In a surprisingly rainy Sydney, over 1200 people gathered last week for the Global Conference of the Extractives Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) – a multistakeholder effort bringing together stakeholders from government, civil society, oil, gas and mining companies and investors in support of transparency to help ensure citizens see the benefits from their country’s natural resources.

Government choice and donor competition - a catalyst for doing development differently?

Nick Manning's picture

The Aid Transparency Initiatives and the focus on the use of country systems, emphasized in the Paris Declaration, encourage donors to publish what they fund and to use existing country public financial management systems. However, this focus on the how of development assistance somewhat distracts from the what. The bigger question really is why donors and governments focus on those particular areas and why those donors are the right partners to begin with.

 

Public Participation in the Budget Process in the Republic of Korea

Young Kyu Kang's picture

A recently released Open Budget Survey conducted by the International Budget Partnership (IBP) ranked the Republic of Korea as the top performer in public participation in the budget process. With a score of 92, Korea rose to the top as the only country “that provides extensive opportunities for public participation” (IBP 2012). Of 100 countries surveyed, the average score for public participation in the budget process was 19 out of 100. IBP found that in many countries there are limited, if any, opportunities provided to the public for engagement in the budget process. So what is it about Korea that makes it an exception?

Beyond transparency: What’s next?

Michael Jarvis's picture

Does transparency lead to development? Not necessarily. At least not when it comes to the oil, gas, and mining sectors. Transparency is important but far from sufficient to improve livelihoods. An ongoing discussion among practitioners on the Governance of Extractive Industries (GOXI) platform reveals a lack of clear answers to this question.

Does better information lead to better development outcomes?

Santhosh Srinivasan's picture

The idea that citizens can directly contribute to strengthening the governance and quality of service delivery has been gaining momentum. The recent globabl uprisings, from revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia to the Occupy Wall Street movements here in the US, have highlighted the important role that individuals play in demanding more accountable governments and policies.