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Media (R)evolutions: Social media as a main source of news on the rise, new study finds

Darejani Markozashvili's picture
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New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Where do you get your news from? Is it TV, printed media, radio, social media? Are they established or new news sources? Your answer probably differs depending on your own media consumption behaviors, your age, where you live, and many other aspects. And your answer may change from year to year. You probably still read, watch, or listen to the similar familiar and trusted sources, but has the way you get to those sources changed overtime? How do you access news? Trying to understand the changing environment around news across countries, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism commissioned the “Digital News Report.”

The latest Digital News Report 2016 found that across their entire sample, 51% of those interviewed (over 50,000 people in 26 countries) used social media as a source of news each week. For one in ten of those used social media as their main source of news. The infographic below shows clear growth of social media as a main source of news (selected countries) just from last year. According to this report, in Brazil, the growth of social media as a main source of news increased from 10% to 18%, while in Denmark it doubled from 6% to 12%. Other selected countries also experienced significant increase. In Greece, 27% said social media was their main source of news. More than TV (21%) and Print (3%).

Film for development

BBC Media Action's picture

This blog was originally posted on the BBC Media Action Insight blog by Melanie Archer, Digital Editor.

Films in the international development sector are often associated with fundraising but they can also serve as a form of aid in themselves. Films can help mothers manage a pregnancy, assist refugees as they navigate life in an unfamiliar country and influence perceptions of what politicians can achieve.

The annual Golden Radiator Awards is a prime opportunity to learn about some of the more creative films the international development sector has produced over the previous 12 months. From the creators of the seasonal (and satirical) Radi-Aid app, these Awards laud charity fundraising films that go beyond stereotypes in their storytelling.  

But what about films for people in development settings?  In parts of the world where radio is still king (though this is rapidly changing), it’s perhaps not surprising that there aren’t as many development films. But while not as plentiful in supply as those geared towards western audiences, examples of such films do exist and can be a powerful tool for meeting the needs of aid beneficiaries. Here are five examples. 

From Kakuma to Rio

FilmAid Broadcasts Olympics in Kakuma Refugee Camp

Media (R)evolutions: the changing face of radio

Darejani Markozashvili's picture
New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

The significance of radio cannot be underestimated. Radio is an important, or sometimes the only, source of information to many around the world who are still unconnected to the Internet. According to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) that number is about 3.9 billion. “While 40% of the population in developing world is online, at least 75% of households in developing countries have access to a radio.”  In that sense, radio is fundamentally more inclusive communication tool.

But as the world moves forward with new technologies and modern communication platforms, the face of radio remains mostly unchanged. Can radio afford to stay this way? How can radio adapt to the 21st century changes? How can it reach and interact with its listeners in the time of snapchat, twitter and other social media channels? Can it leverage these technological changes and turn them into opportunities? If the radio stations want to remain relevant and continue to reach populations worldwide, they need to pay attention to the changing media consumer behaviors, produce the right content, and get it to the consumers in an easy, simple way across all the devices.

Tune in to an ITU special report for the World Radio Day to learn more about the future of radio.
 
Tune in to the Future of Radio - An ITU Special Report

On the Air, Feet on the Ground: Democracy, Development, and FM Radio in Niger

Antonio Lambino's picture

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a viewing and panel discussion of a documentary film entitled Magic Radio: The FM Revolution in Niger at the World Bank headquarters in Washington, D.C.  Mainly about the contribution of private FM radio toward enhancing grassroots democracy, the film also illustrates radio’s efficac