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Global Youth

How Young People Can Usher In the New Era of Governance

Joseph Mansilla's picture

  Simone D. McCourtie/World Bank

Four years ago, I became part of the newly formed Global Youth Anti-Corruption Network (GYAC). It was then a group of about 50 civil society leaders, journalists, and musicians (or “artivists”) who, using various methods, are fighting corruption in their home countries. I was part of the pack of six journalists. After a week of training and networking in Brussels, I came home to the Philippines more inspired and energized than I could remember. I was baptized and inducted into the anti-corruption world, but could a freelance writer be really tipping the scale in ending corruption?

It’s Time for Youth and Governments to Fall in Love

Ravi Kumar's picture
World Bank Group Youth Summit, Photo by Simone D. McCourtie


On a Friday morning in December of 2011, Mohamed Bouazizi, a 26-year-old street vendor, started his day to sell fruits and vegetables from his cart in Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia. But he didn’t have a permit to sell and a policewoman asked him to hand over his cart. He refused. She slapped him.
 
Bouazizi then walked straight to a government building and set himself on fire. In Tunisia, “dignity is more important than bread,” said his sister. That same day, protests began, quickly spreading via mobile and internet. Soon demonstrations were everywhere in the country. About a month later, the president of Tunisia fled.
 
Tunisia inspired many in the Middle East to speak up and protest. We know this phenomenon as the Arab Spring. These protesters, mostly young, challenged their governments in at least 20 countries. Young people demanded accountability, opportunities and transparency.
 
Throughout history, young people have used protests to hold governments accountable. Now, their roles in governments are front and center. Today’s youth are poised for greatness: not only are they the largest demographic in the world but they're also the most connected and educated generation.

Youth Summit 2014: The Need for Open and Responsive Governments

Mario Marcel's picture



Also available in: Español | Français | Arabic  


Yesterday, I was reminded of what it means to be young again: eager faces, fresh idealism, and boundless energy animated the IFC auditorium as more than 300 young leaders from government, civil society, development, and academia packed the IFC auditorium for the World Bank Group’s Youth Summit on “The Need for Open and Responsive Governments.”
 
I had the pleasure of moderating the first plenary session of the summit – a lively discussion exploring how we can give youth a voice in the open government process and ensure that public services address their needs.
 
The panelists were Ahmad Alhendawi, UN Envoy for Youth; Edith Jibunoh, World Bank Group Civil Society Advisor; Nigel Chapman, President and CEO of Plan International; and Frank Vogl, Co-Founder of Transparency International.

Jobs for Youth: A Winning Strategy to End Global Poverty

Arup Banerji's picture


Over the past year, much attention in the development community has been focused on reaching two global milestones by 2030: ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity. The World Bank Group and the International Youth Foundation, together with many of our public, private, and philanthropic partners, have recognized that to reach such ambitious goals, the world must achieve broad-based and inclusive economic growth that is focused directly on youth and jobs. Here's why we think pursuing this strategy is such an urgent priority.

Weekly Wire: The Global Forum

Roxanne Bauer's picture


These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Role reversal as African technology expands in Europe
Phys Org
Africans have long used technology developed abroad, but now a Kenyan cash transfer network which bypasses banks is being adopted in Europe. The M-Pesa mobile money transfer system which allows clients to send cash with their telephones has transformed how business is done in east Africa, and is now spreading to Romania. "From east Africa to eastern Europe, that's quite phenomenal when you think about it," Michael Joseph, who heads Vodafone's Mobile Money business, told AFP in the Kenyan capital Nairobi. "I think that this is something the rest of the world can look at, to say that there are ideas that can emanate out of the developing world, and take it to the developed world."

New Report for Latin America and the Caribbean Freedom of expression and media development: Where are we heading?
UNESCO
Over the past six years, Latin America and the Caribbean continued to comply with the basic conditions that guarantee freedom of expression and media freedom, although the situation has not been homogeneous throughout the 33 countries in the region. Even where strong legislation has existed, implementation has remained a challenge. Several Latin American countries have approved new media laws that have been perceived by some as an opportunity to make the media landscape more pluralistic and less concentrated, and by others as an opportunity for the governments to act against media outlets that have been critical of their administrations. The same debate has applied to steps to revise out-of-date media laws, including those left over from military dictatorships.
 

How Young People Can Make Governments More Open and Responsive

Victoria Flamant's picture

Did you know that today is International Youth Day? It was started by the United Nations in 1999 to bring youth issues to the attention of the international community and celebrate the potential of youth as partners in today’s global society.

5 Things You Need to Know about Open Government

Ravi Kumar's picture


The Internet is abuzz with articles and commentary on how to make government more open. Open government benefits us all. The end result makes governments efficient and responsive, ultimately improving citizens’ lives. Here are some simple answers to questions on open government. Of course, a list like this always needs a disclaimer: This article doesn’t provide you a comprehensive understanding of the open government movement. But it’s a start.

Media (R)evolutions: Digital Natives

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

The world’s “digital natives,” young people born around the time the personal computer was introduced who have spent much of their lives connected with technology, are rapidly increasing in numbers.  Internet usage has increased significantly in the developing world in the past five years, and the digital native population in these countries is expected to increase by more than double by 2017.