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Governments

Youth Employment—A Fundamental Challenge for African Economies

Deon Filmer's picture
In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s sprawling capital, Mulu Warsa has found a formal-sector job as a factory worker thanks to her high school education. In Niamey, a city at the heart of the Sahel region, Mohamed Boubacar is a young apprentice training to be a carpenter. And in Sagrosa, a village in Kenya’s remote Tana Delta district, Felix Roa, who works on a family farm and runs a small shop, dreams of a better life if he can find the money to expand the business and move to a more urban area. His family is too poor to support him through secondary school.
 

Weekly Wire: the Global Forum

Kalliope Kokolis's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

One
Citizens and civil society tell governments: Make budgets public now!

Last Friday in Tanzania, nearly 100 civil society groups and 12 international organizations, including the International Budget Partnership, Greenpeace and ONE, launched a global effort to make public budgets transparent, participatory and accountable. Budgets are the most critical tool that governments have to address problems like poverty, provide critical services like education and health care, and invest in their country’s future. When the political speeches end, it is how governments actually manage funds to meet their promises and priorities that matters.

The Civil Society Movement for Budget Transparency, Accountability and Participation envisions public finance systems that make all budget information easily accessible, provide meaningful opportunities for citizens and civil society to participate in budget decisions and oversight throughout the process, and include strong institutions to hold governments accountable for how they raise and spend the public’s money.  READ MORE

Infrastructure Projects to fuel GCC Migrant Remittances

Y. Sudhir Kumar Shetty's picture

The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states comprising of Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Qatar, Kuwait & Oman, have gained a unique status from the perspective of migration and the international mobility of labor. What makes the Region distinctive is the fact that migrant population forms a majority of inhabitants.

While the finding of oil resulted in substantial wealth creation for these countries, Governments understood that oil wealth must be used to build a strong post-oil economy. This led to Gulf countries launching ambitious large-scale modern infrastructure projects. A major requirement for implementing this plan was the availability of work force. This was addressed by importing both skilled and unskilled workers from the developing countries, particularly Asia.