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Health

Universal Health Coverage and the post-2015 development goal agenda. And Mrs Gauri

Adam Wagstaff's picture

In a recent blogpost I asked whether Universal Health Coverage (UHC) is old wine in a new bottle, and if so whether that’s so bad.

I argued that UHC is ultimately about making sure that “everyone – whether rich or poor – gets the care they need without suffering undue financial hardship as a result.” I suggested UHC embraces three important concepts:

• equity: linking care to need, not to ability pay;
• financial protection: making sure that people's use of needed care doesn't leave their family in poverty; and
• quality of care: making sure providers make the right diagnosis, and prescribe a treatment that's appropriate and affordable.

School Meals Benefit Women and Girls around the World

Donald Bundy's picture

 

March 8 is the First International School Meals Day. New evidence suggests that today around 370 million children will eat a meal at school.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared March 8 the First International School Meals Day -- a celebration of a worldwide phenomenon. The World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Bank have shown that school feeding has been undertaken in nearly every country in the world.

Universal Health Coverage: A Movement Gains Steam

Nicole Klingen's picture

Ministerial meetings aren’t known for their dynamism. As Adam Wagstaff wrote in a recent blog post, these formal interactions sometimes lack the energy—and follow-through—that such high-level gatherings should inspire.

 

However, this wasn’t the case in late February, when the World Bank and the World Health Organization (WHO) met with 27 finance and health ministers, international partners and civil society organizations in Geneva to discuss countries’ progress toward universal health coverage (UHC). The topic energized attendees, who vowed to continue following the path towards UHC in their countries.

A Sketch of a Ministerial Meeting on Universal Health Coverage

Adam Wagstaff's picture

I had been warned—I found it hard to believe—that WHO ministerial meetings can be rather dull affairs of little consequence. Ministers typically take it in turn to read their prepared speeches; their fellow ministers appear to be listening attentively through their headsets but some, it seems, have been known to zap through the simultaneous translation channels in search of lighter entertainment. Speeches aren’t played over the loudspeakers for fear of waking jetlagged ministers from their afternoon naps. WHO is a very considerate organization: it likes to make sure that while on its premises visitors reach “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being.”

Well I’m happy to report that last week’s ministerial meeting on Universal Health Coverage (UHC)—held in Geneva on February 18-19, jointly organized by WHO and the World Bank, and attended by delegates from all over the world (see map)—didn’t fit the stereotype.

Researcher Q/A: Can Early Nutrition Boost a Child’s Economic Future?

Aliza Marcus's picture

It is well-documented that prenatal nutritional supplements can give children the right start in life by supporting development in-utero and improving birth-weight, which reduces infant mortality. But can a case be made that good nutrition early on will give children a measureable earnings boost years later?

Talking to the UN Security Council about Climate Change

Rachel Kyte's picture

Flags at the United Nations. UN Photos

Last week, I had the honor of speaking to the UN Security Council about an increasingly dangerous threat facing cities and countries around the world, a threat that, more and more, is influencing everything that they and we do: climate change.

World Bank President Jim Kim was in Russia talking with G20 finance ministers about the same thing – the need to combat climate change. Every day, we’re hearing growing concerns from leaders around the world about climate change and its impact.

If we needed any reminder of the immediacy and the urgency of the situation, Australia Foreign Minister Bob Carr and our good friend President Tong of Kiribati spoke by video of the security implication of climate effects on the Pacific region. Perhaps most moving of all, Minister Tony deBrum from the Marshall Islands recounted how, 35 years ago, he had come to New York as part of a Marshall Islands delegation requesting the Security Council’s support for their independence. Now, when not independence but survival is at stake, he is told that this is not the Security Council’s function. He pointed to their ambassador to the UN and noted that her island, part of the Marshall Islands, no longer exists. The room was silent.


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