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Weekly wire: The global forum

Roxanne Bauer's picture
These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.
 

Corruption Perceptions Index 2016
Transparency International

Let's get straight to the point: No country gets close to a perfect score in the Corruption Perceptions Index 2016. Over two-thirds of the 176 countries and territories in this year's index fall below the midpoint of our scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean). The global average score is a paltry 43, indicating endemic corruption in a country's public sector. Top-scoring countries (yellow in the map below) are far outnumbered by orange and red countries where citizens face the tangible impact of corruption on a daily basis.

Media Feast, News Famine, Ten Global Advertising Trends that Threaten Independent Journalism
CIMA

Even as citizens feast on an growing buffet of digital media choices, there is an increasing famine of credible, thorough, and independent nationally-focused news reporting. The former masks the latter as people worldwide now have access to an unlimited amount of entertainment through a wide variety of channels and as governments exert more comprehensive and nuanced control over media. Better connected globally, but less informed locally, citizens living in these media environments may not recognize when their rights to be informed about their government and their society are being compromised.

Making growth inclusive: Challenges and opportunities

Vinaya Swaroop's picture
Many advanced economies are experiencing rising income inequality which has raised questions about the benefits of globalization.  Given the growing backlash against perceived job losses associated with the free movement of goods and people particularly in the US and Europe, economists and other development practitioners are renewing their efforts in making economic growth more inclusive and have focused their attention on how to share prosperity equitably.

Inequality is bad for growth of the poor (but not for that of the rich)

Roy Van der Weide's picture

In a new World Bank policy research working paper, Branko Milanovic and I assess the impact of overall inequality, as well as inequality among the poor and among the rich, on the growth rates along various percentiles of the income distribution. The analysis uses micro-census data from U.S. states covering the period from 1960 to 2010. The paper finds evidence that high levels of inequality reduce the income growth of the poor and, if anything, help the growth of the rich.

ADePT-Labor: A New Tool for Understanding Jobs, Poverty, and Inequality

Gladys Lopez-Acevedo's picture

Maize seed quality control at small seed company Bidasem, by CIMMYT, 2012

In light of growing evidence that much of the poverty reduction observed in the past decades has been facilitated by the dynamics of labor markets in developing countries, it is more important than ever to understand the links between labor markets and poverty and income inequality. In an effort to do just that, on October 18, 2012, World Bank researchers launched a revamped labor module for labor market diagnostics as part of its free software program – called ADePT (Automated DEC Poverty Tables) - that offers policy makers globally a helping hand in evidence-based decision making.