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Quito: Turning sustainable transport ideas into reality

Mahmoud Mohieldin's picture
During Habitat III in Quito, Ecuador, World Bank Senior Vice President Mahmoud Mohieldin and Arturo Ardila-Gomez, Global Lead for Urban Mobility & Lead Transport Economist, look at an example of how World Bank-supported operations and technical assistance contribute to the objectives of the Sustainable Development Goal No.11 to make cities inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable.

The World Bank views Planning, Connecting, and Financing as three essential policy tools to nurture inclusive economic growth in cities. The Connecting tool is aimed at connecting people with jobs and schools, and businesses with markets, in order to help promote inclusion. Within the framework of its transport initiative, Sustainable Mobility for All, the World Bank is assisting client countries and cities in developing urban transport projects and policies that support both public transport and non-motorized transport. 

Is there a connection between PPPs, climate change, and life insurance? Turns out there is.

David Lawrence's picture

Photo Credit: United Nations

Public-private partnerships fit well into many sectors and industries, most obviously infrastructure and social services. But I never connected PPPs to the life insurance sector until I read a recent online interview with Andreas Gruber, the Chief Investment Officer of Allianz, a German insurance and asset management company. In the interview, Gruber gives a lucid assessment of PPPs and why they are important to Allianz.

Capital project and infrastructure spending outlook: Agile strategies for changing markets

Paul da Rita's picture

Photo Credit: hans-johnson via Flickr Creative Commons

A recent report by PwC on the outlook for global infrastructure spending predicts that by 2020, annual global infrastructure spending will reach $5.3 trillion, up from an estimated $4.3 trillion in 2015. This represents a global spending growth of 5% per annum doubling the low rates of growth of just 2% expected this year.

Reasons for optimism in closing the infrastructure financing gap

Jason Zhengrong Lu's picture

There is no doubt a significant financing gap exists for investments in infrastructure in emerging markets and developing economies, a gap that stands in the way of funding projects crucial to providing basic services to transform living conditions across the globe. We at the Global Infrastructure Facility (GIF) recognize that addressing the infrastructure gap can get us closer to eliminating poverty and boosting shared prosperity.
After attending a discussion with a prestigious panel of finance ministers and senior financiers at the event “Making Infrastructure Rewarding,”—hosted by the GIF on the eve of the IMF-World Bank Group’s 2016 annual meetings in Washington, D.C, I feel there is a lot to be optimistic about in the way infrastructure is viewed and financed using the right instruments to fill the gap.
Given the standing-room-only attendance at the event—which was also live-streamed—and the number of comments and tweets that came in using #investininfra, there is clearly enormous interest in how we get from point A to B.

Eight things we know about water and electricity utilities in Africa

Luis Andres's picture

Infrastructure is one of the most important forces driving economic growth and poverty reduction.Yet Africa’s infrastructure networks lag increasingly behind those of other developing countries in providing telecom, electricity, and water supply and sanitation services. Two-thirds of the population in the region lacks access to electricity and five out of six people don't have access to piped water. The people and industries that do have services pay twice as much as those outside Africa, further reducing regional competitiveness and growth. As cities continue to flood with migrants looking for better economic opportunities, power and water utilities are being challenged to improve the services offered to existing and new users. Given scarce resources and competing development priorities, it is essential to establish ways of using resources (and knowledge!) more effectively. 

In case you missed it, watch the replay for "Making Infrastructure Rewarding" -- coming soon

WBG PPP's picture

Watch the livestream here, and keep the conversation going with us on Twitter via our handle @WBG_PPP and the hashtag #InvestInInfra.

Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 
Time: 20:00 - 21:30 GMT/ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm EDT or convert time

Field of Dreams: Mapping the Landscape for Investing in Emerging Market Infrastructure

Joaquim Levy's picture

Estimates of the financing gap for emerging market infrastructure range from nearly half a trillion USD to more than US$1 trillion a year over the next decade. The range reflects the difference between the estimated level of infrastructure needed to sustain growth across emerging markets and the actual level of such investment.
The challenges are immense, and resources are scarce. Of the financing that does exist, more than 70% comes from national government budgets; the second largest source (roughly 20%) is the private sector; and remaining resources come from overseas development assistance or aid from developed economies1. Given the overstretched demands of public sector budgets in developed and developing countries alike, any increase is likely to come through more partnership and co-financing from the private sector. 

Understanding institutional investors for infrastructure – The collaborative model

Rajiv Sharma's picture

One of the key objectives for our research program at the Stanford Global Projects Center is to understand how the largest sources of capital in the world can be channeled into critical infrastructure and development projects most in need of it. In particular, we focus on long-term institutional investors (pension funds and sovereign wealth funds) and private development firms at one end of the spectrum, and government procurement agencies and departments at the other. We are essentially trying to assist in overcoming a number of inefficiencies that seem to be apparent in linking the original source of capital to projects on the ground. In this blog post, we would like to highlight some of the latest trends and issues confronting the institutional investor space; in subsequent blogs, we will showcase some of the work we have done at the government procurement level to facilitate investment.

Are you being served? The gap between effective and nominal access to infrastructure services

Sumila Gulyani's picture
 Sumila Gulyani / World Bank
Amina and her family in Dakar, Senegal have a metered private water tap in their yard, 
but they don’t use it. (Photo: Sumila Gulyani / World Bank)

Amina and her family had recently moved to their new house on the outskirts of Dakar, Senegal. It was built by the government to relocate families from low-lying and flood-prone neighborhoods in the city. The house was small for her extended family of ten, but it was water that she worried about. I was puzzled. Usually people complain that water connection costs are too high, but she received that connection for free—the meter and tap were right there in her front yard.

Why did she worry?

Financing the future of America's infrastructure through PPPs

Doug Maher's picture

Photo Credit: Mark Anderson via Flickr Creative Commons

If you live in urban areas – which, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, over 80% of Americans do – you know the feelings associated with traffic. Busy roadways and overcrowded public transit lines are just some of the many consequences of the increased need for infrastructure investment in the U.S. To grow sustainably, cities must continue to make major investments in infrastructure – across healthcare, transportation, utilities, buildings, energy and even within our industrial base.