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Low-skilled Labor

Non-tradable sector wages track high-skilled tradable sector wages

Oscar Calvo-González's picture

Recent data on hourly wages in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) reveal that Latin Americans working in the non-tradable sector (as in construction, transportation, hotels, or education) earn much more than workers in low-skill tradable sectors such as agriculture or low-tech manufacturing, and closer to high-skill workers in the tradable sector such as high-tech manufacturing or finance. Despite slight variations across countries, in 11 out of 17 countries studied, the difference between wages in low-skill tradable and non-tradable sectors has grown over the last ten years.[1] In most of these countries, hourly wages display a distinct trend: positive growth for high-skill tradable and non-tradable wages, and stagnating, or even declining for low-skill tradable wages.
 

Graph showing trends in non-tradable wages in Latin America

Source: World Bank's LAC Equity Lab
 

Low-skilled labor migration: Korea’s Employment Permit System

Soonhwa Yi's picture

(In observance of the International Migrants Day on December 18)

In response to looming labor shortages in the so-called “3-D” industries (difficult, dangerous, dirty), Korea has allowed the entry of low-skilled foreign workers since 1990’s. Its Industrial Trainee Scheme introduced in 1993 was inadequate to address labor demand (an increasing employment of irregular foreign workers), unequipped to warrant trainees’ labor rights and social protection, and associated with high recruitment cost borne by trainees. The latter appears to be liked with trainees’ overstay - to recoup their initial sunk cost.