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New country classifications by income level

World Bank Data Team's picture

Each year on July 1, the analytical classification of the world's economies based on estimates of gross national income (GNI) per capita for the previous year is revised. As of 1 July 2016, low-income economies are defined as those with a GNI per capita, calculated using the World Bank Atlas method, of $1,025 or less in 2015; lower middle-income economies are those with a GNI per capita between $1,026 and $4,035; upper middle-income economies are those with a GNI per capita between $4,036 and $12,475; high-income economies are those with a GNI per capita of $12,476 or more. The updated GNI per capita estimates are also used as input to the World Bank's operational guidelines that determines lending eligibility.

Changes in classification

The country and lending groups page provides a complete list of economies classified by income, region, and lending status. The classification tables include all World Bank members, plus all other economies with populations of more than 30,000. Please note, regions include economies at all income levels. The term country, used interchangeably with economy, does not imply political independence but refers to any territory for which authorities report separate social or economic statistics. Click here for information about how the World Bank classifies countries. The updated World Development Indicators database, GNI per capita data, and income-level aggregations will be available at data.worldbank.org from Tuesday July 5th.

Below you will find the list of countries with new income groups.

Economy Old group New group
Cambodia Low Lower middle
Equatorial Guinea High Upper middle
Georgia Lower middle Upper middle
Guyana Lower middle Upper middle
Mongolia Upper middle Lower middle
Russian Federation High Upper middle
Senegal Lower middle Low
Tonga Upper middle Lower middle
Tunisia Upper middle Lower middle
Venezuela, RB High Upper middle

Media (R)evolutions: TV is still the king of news worldwide

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

For years, researchers and social critics have speculated that social media and niche interest sites were capturing more and more attention of people, thereby supplanting traditional sources of news like radio, television, and print. Much of the concern has come from data that mobile phones are proliferating around the world and that adults aged 21-34 — so-called Millennials — do not visit news sites, read print newspapers, or watch television news. Instead, this generation (and Generation Z, which follows it) spends more time on social networks, often on mobile devices. This trend can be seen worldwide, as newspapers have become a dying breed in many countries.

Nevertheless, if the current media preferences of young adults are an indication of the future, the data may offer bad news for print media, but good news for TV.  According to a Nielsen global survey of more than 30,000 online consumers across 60 countries, television is still the most popular source of news for people around the world. When asked where they get the news, 53% of the respondents named television as one of their preferred sources. Click on the image below to see how each generation differs in their media use.
 
preferred sources of news globally

 

Does “Rational Ignorance” make working on transparency and accountability a waste of time?

Duncan Green's picture

Guest post from Paul O’Brien, Vice President for Policy and Campaigns, Oxfam America (gosh, they do have august sounding job titles, don’t they?)

As the poorest half of the planet sees that just 62 people have more wealth than all of them, collective frustration at extreme inequality is increasing.  To rebalance power and wealth, many in our community are turning to transparency, accountability, participation and inclusion.  Interrogate that “development consensus,” however, and opinions are fractured over the benefits and costs of transferring power from the haves to the have-nots.

Social Media Information OverloadIn truth, our theories of change often diverge.  Most development organizations may agree on the need to advocate for more Investment, Innovation, Information, strong Institutions and Incentives, but some organizations are genuinely committed to only one of those “I’s”, and that can be problematic:  Oxfam often finds itself choosing and moving between the relentless positivity of politically benign theories of change (e.g. we just need more “investment” or “innovation”), the moderation of those who focus exclusively on transparent “information” with no clear pathway to ensure its political relevance, and the relentless negativity of activists that think the only way to transform “institutions” or realign the “incentives” of elites is to beat them up in public.

Oxfam’s challenge is to be both explicit in our theory of change and show sophistication and dexterity in working across that spectrum.  If Oxfam’s theory of change is based on a citizen-centered approach to tackling global systemic challenges like extreme inequality, then our opportunity may be engaging the “rational ignorance” of citizens and consumers.
 

Media (R)evolutions: Where people get their news depends on their age

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

We have known for years that people are getting their news from an increasing array of sources -- from traditional print and radio to internet and social media. How people consume news, moreover, varies a great deal from country to country.  In many developed countries television and online news are the most frequently accessed sources, while print newspapers have declined significantly. In contrast, newspapers are thriving in some middle- and low-income countries where both print and online circulations are popular. Social media is also growing as a source for news, but is doing so unevenly

However, the state of news consumption looks even more interesting- and trend lines emerge- when generational differences are considered. With age segmentation, we can see that online news is the most popular source for young people aged 18-24 who have grown up with the Internet, while TV is most popular with adults older than 55.  This is important to note because current estimates from the United Nations Population Fund indicate that there are approximately 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24 in the world, and many of them live in developing countries where mobile devices that provide access to online news are increasingly common.

Main Source of News by Age

Listening, watching…and forgetting

Sina Odugbemi's picture

People watch TV through shop windowMore and more of us these days consume news in a multiplatform manner, and every week, every day even, we learn about a fresh outrage that has occurred somewhere in the world.

Instantly.

The news media stay on each outrage for a while. A plane crashes. Why? How? The pilot flew the plane into the mountain? Goodness! Why? How did the airline miss his descent into madness? And on and on they go. For a while, it is a frenzy of analysis, fresh angles, scandal-hunting, scapegoats-sniffing and so on.

Eventually, the media move on to the next outrage. What is interesting is that we tend to move on before the media do. There is a lag before the media realize that we are bored with the story, that we are mentally blocking it, and that the readership or audience numbers are no longer sky-high.

That moving on from the intense coverage of the latest outrage that we do is what I find fascinating. For we don’t just move on, without conscious effort we try to forget about the outrage because we have to get on with our lives. We are naturally good at forgetting. The question is: why do we practice forgetting so skillfully?

Release of World Development Indicators 2015

World Bank Data Team's picture

The 2015 edition of World Development Indicators (WDI) has just been released. WDI 2015 provides high-quality cross-country comparable statistics about development and people's lives around the globe. Read the blog post here. The WDI suite of products can be accessed from data.worldbank.org/wdi, and include:

  • A full text of the WDI as a PDF file which is also accessible from Open Knowledge Repository (OKR).
  • The Little Data Book 2015, a pocket edition of the WDI, which is also available from OKR and the PDF file can be accessed by clicking here.
  • An update to the WDI database including notes and metadata explaining the relevance of the indicators for development, their source, and their methodology. Visit databank.worldbank.org or click here to get direct access to the database.
  • Online tables: 87 tables presenting country and aggregate data organized into six main topics (World View, People, Environment, Economy, States and Markets, and Global Links) providing both data and comprehensive "About the Data" explanations. These tables are automatically updated quarterly and can be accessed and downloaded from http://wdi.worldbank.org/tables.
  • Interactive Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Dashboards: These dashboards provide MDG progress status for regions, income classifications, and other groups. http://data.worldbank.org/mdgs.
  • The WDI "DataFinder" application available in English, Spanish, French and Chinese, in tablet and mobile phone editions for both Android and iOS. The current version has been updated with new data, and a new version will be available at the end of April.

International Debt Statistics 2015 now available

World Bank Data Team's picture
IDS 2014

The 2015 edition of International Debt Statistics (IDS) has just been released. IDS 2015 draws from comprehensive databases of debt statistics collected from 124 low- and middle-income countries, as well as quarterly external and public sector debt from high-income countries.

These databases continue to be a vital input for debt managers and researchers around the world working to improve the management of global capital flows.  Making these resources available to everyone is an important element of the World Bank Group's commitment to open data. Users can easily navigate these online resources to view, graph, and download the debt statistics of countries worldwide.

2013 Global and Regional Estimates for Child Malnutrition Released

World Bank Data Team's picture

UNICEF, WHO, and the World Bank Group released in September an updated joint dataset and interactive dashboards of the 1990 – 2013 global and regional estimates for child malnutrition indicators – underweight, stunting, wasting, severe wasting, and overweight prevalence and numbers.  As a precision measure, all estimates are accompanied with their 95% confidence intervals.  Wasting and severe wasting, a serious malnutrit

New Quarterly External Debt Statistics (QEDS) database launched based on the latest international standards

World Bank Data Team's picture

The World Bank, in collaboration with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Statistics Department, launched the new Quarterly External Debt Statistics (QEDS) database featuring new concepts and definitions as well as new classifications of external debt statistics (EDS) and tables that enhance their analytical use.


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