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Three ways to manage construction risk to support infrastructure investment

Eric Dean Cook's picture


Photo: Pixabay

At the Global Infrastructure Facility (GIF) Advisory Council Meeting in March, we talked about construction risk and the way it shapes the delivery environment early in a project’s investment life. As a practicing engineer accustomed to attacking construction risk at the granular level, I enjoyed the broader discussion, particularly from the banking and credit perspective (meeting outcomes).

Unfortunately, construction risk realization will continue to be the norm. Perhaps we need to consider taking the longer view to reach potential investors by aligning the risk environment with risk tolerance.

Here are three ways to do this:

Catalyzing Change: Regional Roundtables on Infrastructure Governance

Olivier Fremond's picture
Also available in: Français


Photo: Pressmaster / Shutterstock.com

In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, policy makers focused on improving access to finance, missing the crux of the problem: governance.

In pursuit of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals through the 2015 Addis Ababa Action Agenda on financing for development, the Regional Roundtables on Infrastructure Governance* were created to promote a community of practice comprising government officials and the international development community to strengthen capacities within developing countries and establish good practices in infrastructure governance across various government sectors.

The inaugural roundtable, hosted by the Development Bank of Southern Africa, will take place in Cape Town on November 2-3, 2017, and aims to emphasize that for the commercial financing of infrastructure to be a viable option, governance reforms must happen.

PPI Database users leave their mark on the new resources section

Deblina Saha's picture


Photo: yuttana Contributor Studio / Shutterstock.com

Most of us carry out research and report our findings with the expectation—or at least a hope—of an audience.
 
Yet fewer amongst us are familiar with our audience, even though their feedback may help us improve our work.
 
We, the team behind the Private Participation in Infrastructure (PPI) Database—the most comprehensive database of private investments in infrastructure in the developing world—continue to strengthen the database and our ensuing analyses. Learning more about our audience is an important component of these efforts. 

Nigeria: Getting PPPs right

Laurence Carter's picture

The Nigerian government’s Infrastructure Concession Regulatory Commission has blazed an important trail, publishing details of 51 Federal Public Private Partnership (PPP) contracts—the culmination of a year’s work with the World Bank to ensure that all, non-confidential information is easily accessible to the public. We hope other countries will follow Nigeria’s trend-setting lead.

Preparing bankable infrastructure projects

Fida Rana's picture

Photo: Magnus D | Flickr Creative Commons

The issue of bankability of infrastructure projects has long been a topic of discussion by the development and investors’ communities and is one of the key bottlenecks in attracting private capital to meet the global infrastructure gap and to provide millions of people with the key services they lack.
 
Under German presidency, the Business 20 (B20)—a platform that enables the global business community to contribute to international policy discussions—submitted 20 recommendations to Group of Twenty (G20) leaders under the theme “Building Resilience—Improving Sustainability—Assuming Responsibility.” Recommendation 14 is on boosting infrastructure finance and reads:
 
G20 members should boost infrastructure finance by developing and promoting bankable and investment-ready infrastructure project pipelines and by enhancing the role of Multilateral Development Banks as catalysts for private sector investment.
 
The B20 task force on infrastructure confirms “the investment gap in infrastructure is not the result of a shortage of capital. Real long-term interest rates are low, there is ample supply of long-term finance, interest by the private sector is high, and the benefits are obvious.” However, a number of factors hold back investment in terms of financing and funding. “The main challenge is to find bankable and investment-ready projects.”

Nigeria blazes the trail for PPP disclosures with new web portal

Chidi Izuwah's picture

Photo: Cristiano Zingale | Flickr Creative Commons

"The nation has a huge infrastructure deficit for which we require foreign capital and expertise to supplement whatever resources we can marshal at home. In essence, increased engagement with the outside world is called for as we seek public-private partnerships in our quest for enhanced capital and expertise. This is the way of the new world for all countries in the 21st century." – HE President Muhammadu Buhari

Within the first 100 days of his administration, President Muhammadu Buhari signaled his administration’s commitment to attracting the private capital and expertise needed to address Nigeria’s infrastructure deficit. This led to a renewed engagement between the World Bank Group and Nigeria to enhance the attractiveness of the Public-Private Partnership (PPP) ecosystem in the country. 

David Baxter - 10 Candid Career Questions with Infrastructure & PPP professionals

David Baxter's picture



Editor's Note: 

Welcome to the “10 Candid Career Questions” series, introducing you to the infrastructure and PPP professionals who do the deals, analyze the data, and strategize on the next big thing. Each of them followed a different path into infra and/or PPP practice, and this series offers an inside look at their backgrounds, motivations, and choices. Each blogger receives the same 10 questions that tell their career story candidly and without jargon. We hope you will be surprised and inspired.

Boosting access to market-based debt financing for sub-national entities

Kirti Devi's picture



Many countries are experiencing urbanization within the context of increased decentralization and fiscal adjustment. This puts sub-national entities (local governments, utilities and state-owned enterprises) in the position of being increasingly responsible for developing and financing infrastructure and providing services to meet the needs of growing populations.
 
However, decentralization in many situations is still a work in progress. And often there is a mismatch between the ability of sub-nationals to provide services, and the autonomy or authority necessary to make decisions and access financing—often leaving them dependent on national governments. Additionally, they may also contend with inadequate regulatory and policy frameworks and weak domestic financial and capital markets. 

Filling the local PPP capacity gap in Brazil: how the CP3P program can help

Marcos Siqueira's picture


Photo: Passarinho/Pref.Olinda | Flickr Creative Commons

A few weeks ago, I delivered the training for the Certified Public-Private Partnership Professional (CP3P) Preparation exam to a group in São Paulo. I was about to commence my closing remarks at the end of the three-day very intensive journey, when a particularly dedicated participant asked: “Why is it that we have never heard of so many of these concepts before?”
 
It was indeed a very good question.

PPP contract clauses unveiled: the World Bank’s 2017 Guidance on PPP Contractual Provisions

Christina Paul's picture



What are the key considerations for a public authority when drafting a Force Majeure provision in a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) contract? What are the differences between emerging and developed PPP markets in treating Change in Law clauses? And are there particular legal matters that need to be contemplated in a civil law jurisdiction rather than in a common law country when dealing with termination payments under a PPP agreement?

These are only some of the questions the World Bank Group’s recently-published Guidance on PPP Contractual Provisions, 2017 edition aims to address for the benefit of public authorities (contracting authorities) involved in PPPs. This blog is the first in a series of posts that will discuss and explore the issues covered in the 2017 Guidance


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