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What exactly is the public-private mix in health care?

Adam Wagstaff's picture

I’ve been in quite a few meetings recently and read quite a lot of documents where people have made claims about the relative sizes of the public and private sectors in health care delivery. A recent report from the World Bank Group on the private sector in Africa claims that “the private health sector now provides half of all health services in the region.” A document I reviewed recently claimed that “much” of medical care is provided by the private sector – an assertion I hear quite often.

As far as I can make out, the data underlying such claims reflect a very partial picture. The Africa data are from the Demographic Health Survey which captures only treatment for (outpatient) maternal and child health services (MCH); it also covers only the developing world, and only the poorer part of it. Some claims reflect data for just one country. I’ve heard a lot about India, but these data (obviously) cover just India, and only outpatient visits.

Media Regulation: Who Needs Your Protection?

Anne-Katrin Arnold's picture

Freedom of expression and media freedom - most contentious issues not only in autocracies but, seemingly increasingly, also in democracies. It's a fine line between regulating the media and strangling it. Who should be protected by media regulation? The media? The public? Freedom of expression? The government? National security?

Let's start with the media. Does the media need protection? Surely - at least to some extend media systems need to be shielded from being overwhelmed by economic and political interests. If we assume that a free and balanced media is fundamental to a healthy balance between the state and its citizens there need to be safeguards that allow journalists to report without fear of repercussions.

Quote of the Week: Jeremy Bentham

Sina Odugbemi's picture

版本: English

我们如何用新思维考虑扩大农民主导型灌溉以支持全球粮食安全和减贫?这是2017年粮食生产用水国际论坛讨论的核心问题。本次论坛的主题为“水确保粮食安全:从地方经验到全球影响”,它是基于全球性突破通常受地方行动驱动这一前提提出的。

本次论坛由世界银行和内布拉斯加大学多尔蒂粮食生产用水研究所联合主办,由多个合作伙伴提供赞助。论坛展示了农户代表、私营部门、国家和国际政策制定者以及主要国际金融机构的心声——激励由多方组成的支持联盟使农民主导型灌溉合法化并成为主要发展议程,特别是在非洲。
 

图片1说明:温室大棚中的水栽黄瓜。
摄影:Sashko(经由ShutterStock提供)

Stairway to Mobilization

Anne-Katrin Arnold's picture

The ultimate goal for working on the demand side from a political communication perspective is the mobilization of the public. We want to drive citizens who lack information and efficacy to being an active public, participating as relevant actors in the public sphere and in thereby in political decision making processes. Here at CommGAP, we base our approach on a range of literature from the study of public opinion and social movements and came up with what we call the "Stairway to Mobilization." In the coming days and weeks we will try to illustrate this concept with practical examples and case studies, but for now lets discuss the theoretical background.

Quote of the Week

Anne-Katrin Arnold's picture

"A group ‘makes up its mind’ in very much the same manner that the individual makes up his. […] not only one mind but all minds are searched for pertinent material, which is poured into the general stream of thought for each to use as he can. In this manner the minds in a communicating group become a single organic whole. Their unity is not one of identity, but of life and action, a crystallization of diverse but related ideas."

Charles H. Cooley, 1909,
in Social Organization: A Study of the Larger Mind

Media Indicators and the Public: It’s Not You, It’s Me!

Antonio Lambino's picture


Around the world, rural women are a major provider of food and food security. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations argues that improving women’s access to productive resources (such as land) could increase agricultural output by as much as 2.5% to 4%. At the same time, women would produce 20-30% more food, and their families would enjoy better health, nutrition, and education.

But women in rural areas often face both formal and informal barriers to accessing and owning land. Today, only 30% of land rights are registered or recorded worldwide, and women are the least secure in their access to land rights, with major gaps existing between law and practice in many developing countries.