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Thailand’s small school challenge and options for quality education

Dilaka Lathapipat's picture



Despite Thailand’s success in expanding educational access, new empirical evidence suggests that much more needs to be done to maximize the potential of its students. The 2012 PISA reading assessment reveals that almost one-third of Thai 15 year-old students were “functionally illiterate,” lacking critical skills needed for employment tasks that require reading skills beyond a basic level. Furthermore, the performance gap among schools has been widening in recent years. Unsurprisingly, the disadvantaged and poorer-performing students are concentrated in small rural village schools.

How Empowering Women Can Help End Poverty in Africa

Makhtar Diop's picture

A week ago we hosted an informal workshop with some academic researchers, policymakers and World Bank staff to review "The second generation of evaluations" of CCT programs. We finally have the website, where you can see all the presentations made available by the authors and video of the event. Two posts in the Development Impact blog (here and here) go into more detail on the effectiveness of conditions — their theory, evidence and the conflicting values around them. In blog posts today and tomorrow we’ll summarize discussion of the whole workshop. Today we introduce it and focus on the human capital formation side of things. Tomorrow we consider the poverty reduction objective, how CCTS are working in low income countries, and some "new frontiers" with respect to considering behavior, governance, supply, costs, and wider social protection strategies.

Philippines: Education that Knows No Boundaries

Nicholas Tenazas's picture
版本: English
尽管女性的市场潜力惊人——其共计掌控着200万亿美元消费类支出的权力,但其作为经济增长引擎的角色却未得到私营部门的关注。女性在正规金融机构中开立账户的可能性比男性低20%。然而,开立银行账户是实现金融包容性的第一步。

私营部门帮助女性迈出这第一步为何重要?

在竞争性日益增强的全球市场上,企业正在寻找相关方法来体现其自身特色,巩固其在现有市场上的地位,向新市场拓展。面向女性进一步普及金融服务,可创造更多市场机遇,给企业带来巨大盈利潜力。女性相关市场的规模及其带来的商业机会都很惊人: 
 
  • 企业信贷:女性任企业主的正规小企业面临的贷款缺口达3000亿美元。全世界140个国家的800-100万此类企业中,超70%很少或未得到金融服务。
  • 保险产品: 《哈弗商业评论》刊登的研究论文 《女性相关经济》指出,据计算,女性保险市场规模达数万亿美元。
  • 电子支付:女性没有或不使用手机意味着数以百万计女性不能使用电子支付系统。今后五年内,这一技术使用方面的缺口如能弥合,则有可能为手机产业开辟1700万亿美元市场


面向女性进一步普及金融服务,可创造更多市场机遇,给企业带来巨大盈利潜力。


国际金融公司供职的几年中,我一直与私营部门(即私营金融机构)合作,应对女性在试图进入正轨金融系统过程中面临的供需测制约。国际金融公司通过以下三项措施应对此类制约:
  • 确定女性相关市场的规模、女性任企业主及其主导的中小企业的数量以及金融服务女性消费者的人数;
  • 通过开发并提供把信贷、储蓄和保险等金融产品与商业技能培训等非金融类服务融为一体的服务,向金融机构展示如何挖掘女性相关市场潜力;
  • 通过网络、手机、无网点银行等便利渠道扩大金融服务对女性的覆盖。

Relaunching Africa Can and Sharing Africa’s Growth

Francisco Ferreira's picture
Malawi IHS4 Enumerator administering household questionnaire
using World Bank Survey Solutions
Photo credit: Heather Moylan, World Bank

The Malawi National Statistical Office (NSO), in collaboration with the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS), disseminated the findings from the Fourth Integrated Household Survey 2016/17 (IHS4), and the Integrated Household Panel Survey 2016 (IHPS), on November 22, 2017 in Lilongwe, Malawi. Both surveys were implemented under the World Bank Living Standards Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA) initiative, with funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

The IHS4 is the fourth cross-sectional survey in the IHS series, and was fielded from April 2016 to April 2017. The IHS4 2016/17 collected information from a sample of 12,447 households, representative at the national-, urban/rural-, regional- and district-levels.

In parallel, the third (2016) round of the Integrated Household Panel Survey (IHPS) ran concurrently with the IHS4 fieldwork. The IHPS 2016 targeted a national sample of 1,989 households that were interviewed as part of the IHPS 2013, and that could be traced back to half of the 204 panel enumeration areas that were originally sampled as part of the Third Integrated Household Survey (IHS3) 2010/11.

The panel sample expanded each wave through the tracking of split-off individuals and the new households that they formed. The IHPS 2016 maintained a 4 percent household-level attrition rate (the same as 2013), while the sample expanded to 2,508 households. The low attrition rate was not a trivial accomplishment given only 54 percent of the IHPS 2016 households were within one kilometer of their 2010 location.

Education in Timor-Leste has grown from the ashes

Joao dos Santos's picture

 


Timor-Leste is making great progress in education, which is considered an important
asset as the country looks to achieve sustainable, long-term development.

 

Eleven years since the restoration of Independence, Timor-Leste has now emerged from the ashes of destruction that devastated the country. During the conflict, most of the country’s infrastructure was demolished with over 95 percent of schools burnt to the ground.

Lack of infrastructure was only one of the many challenges facing Timor-Leste’s education. During the period of occupation most skilled teachers were not native Timorese and at the end of the conflict many evacuated, leaving very few trained teachers. Only a small number stayed on in the hope of driving education out of the darkness.

Haiti: two years after quake, tangible signs of progress

James Martone's picture

My foray into climate change in the World Bank Group started with the drought-affected regions in Andhra Pradesh, India in 2003. The WB had just started thinking about adaptation to climate change and was trying to begin a dialogue with developing countries dealing with overwhelming challenges of poverty. With my colleagues in India, we began looking at drought-proofing in Andhra Pradesh without labeling this a `climate change’ study. In many ways, this was probably the first attempt to integrate adaptation into a Bank rural poverty reduction project. Two years later, the study was well received and became the pilot for drought-adaptation, to be linked to India’s National Rural Employment Guarantee Program.

This experience served as a laboratory for us to learn lessons that have helped mould Bank’s engagement with climate change. It went on to shape the key features of the Strategic Framework on Development and Climate Change (SFDCC) that was approved a year ago. Connecting with client countries and listening to their concerns became the cornerstone for the SFDCC. The Framework was formulated through an extensive global consultation with both World Bank Group staff and external stakeholders. It was the process itself that helped build ownership for climate change work inside the Bank Group and among client countries.