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SDGs and Beyond

SDGs and PPPs: What's the connection?

Mahmoud Mohieldin's picture


Photo: World Bank Group

By committing to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), countries pledge to pursue progress on economic, social, and environmental targets, in a balanced and integrated manner. The SDGs are cross-cutting and ambitious, and require a shift in how we work in partnership. They also push us to significantly change the level of both public and private investment in all countries.

We need creative solutions to leverage each partner’s comparative advantage. We also need to mobilize private sector investment and innovation in support of the SDGs.

Whither international banking?

Mahmoud Mohieldin's picture


The Public-Private Partnership Reference Guide has been downloaded more than 18,000 times since it was first launched in 2012. The Guide’s popularity reflects its value. The Guide offers:
  • A solid overview of the core elements of public-private partnerships (PPPs); and
  • A rich collection of references to the best-available PPP-related materials.
The 3rd version of the PPP Reference Guide has just been published. Like its predecessors, it provides in-depth coverage of PPP basics, the PPP framework, and the steps involved in the PPP process.
 
This version, however, offers several additions and improvements that add greater value to PPP practitioners:  The Guide also includes numerous examples and case studies that shed light on PPP issues in different sectors and regions.
 
Going forward, we will publish monthly posts that highlight specific sections of the Guide, illustrating how seasoned practitioners and novices alike can use it to strengthen their knowledge of PPPs and apply it to real-world developmental challenges.

The Global Goals: Economic transformation in an interconnected world

Paul McClure's picture
Women beneficiaries from Maguindanao, southern Philippines, with World Bank Country Director Mara Warwick. These women are participating in livelihood projects under the multi-donor Mindanao Trust Fund. Photo: Justine Letargo/World Bank

Peace – something that many of us take for granted in our own lives – is elusive for millions of people around the world, including in southern Philippines. Long-standing conflict between the government and rebel groups, and a complicated patchwork of clan and family conflicts, has led to decades of economic stagnation and poverty in one of the Philippines’ most beautiful and productive regions – Mindanao. A peace process is hopefully nearing its conclusion and is expected to bring autonomy and with it, greater opportunities for peace and development to the people of the Bangsamoro.

The Philippines is a middle-income country – with GDP at $2,953 per capita and a robust economy, with almost 96% enrollment rate in basic education, and improving health indicators such as child mortality; overall the country is doing well. But these numbers mask sharp regional contrasts: in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) the GDP per capita is only $576 – equivalent to countries like Rwanda and Afghanistan – the poverty rate is 53.7%, and more than 50% of its employed population are in agriculture with 80% of them working as subsistence farmers, living precariously from crop to crop.  One crop failure can mean ruin for a family.

Billions to trillions: Financing the Global Goals

Gavin E.R. Wilson's picture

 

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The Philippines is one of the fastest urbanizing countries in East Asia and the Pacific. This can bring many opportunities for growth and poverty reduction. Cities become engines of growth if well planned and well managed.


Rapid urbanization in the Philippines has brought new jobs, educational opportunities, and better living conditions for some. However, it has also brought challenges, which you’ll see when you move around the streets of Metro Manila. It’s a large sprawling metropolitan area of over 12 million, with congestion that is estimated to cost US$70 million (₱3.5 billion) a day. When it rains, streets and homes are quickly flooded because many drains are clogged or non-existent. Because of lack of affordable housing, an estimated 11 percent of the city’s population live in slums. With 17 cities and municipalities in the metropolitan area, trying to tackle these challenges becomes stuck in deep complexities of urban governance and management. While other cities in the Philippines don’t face the scale of these challenges, they tackle similar issues.
 

How to finance development: Six ideas from young leaders

Martin Sterlicchi's picture
Photo: Saroeun Bou/World Bank

Before I set foot in this beautiful country, I was told the story of Siv Mao and her newborn baby.

Last year, Siv Mao, a young woman from a village in northern Cambodia gave birth to a boy after an emergency Caesarean section at a new hospital in her province’s capital.

The boy was named Rith Samnang “Lucky” for a good reason: without the doctors and modern equipment in the new 16 Makara Hospital in Preah Vihear, he wouldn’t have been able to survive.

The traditional midwife had difficulty assisting the birth at her home, and other hospitals were far away.

Baby Lucky is a symbol of Cambodia’s development success in the last decade: the country has gone a long way in improving economic and social conditions for its people, especially the poorest.

State of global development: Why 2015 is a pivotal year for ending poverty

Jim Yong Kim's picture
© Arne Hoel/World Bank


In this series, professionals debate the state – and future – of their industry. Read all the posts here and write your own (use #MyIndustry in the body of your post).

I work in one of the most rewarding fields imaginable – helping low- and middle-income countries develop so that poor people have a fair chance at reaching their full potential. My field of work is at a critical crossroads, and it is no exaggeration that the decisions we make this year will have an impact on everyone in the world and especially the poorest.

In praise of folly: How modern development partners are learning the lessons of Erasmus

Bertrand Badré's picture
每当我听说又发生了自然灾害——人员伤亡,家园被毁,生计丧失——我就知道我们必须要减少这些悲惨后果,而不是坐等灾害再次来袭。

今年在日本仙台举办的世界减少灾害风险大会将给我们这个机会。此次大会寻求落实《兵库行动框架》后续框架,为政策制定者和国际利益攸关方管理灾害风险提供指导。此次大会是为减少灾害风险和战胜贫困设立新的里程碑的一个契机。

自然灾害的代价已经十分高昂——在过去30年里人员和财产损失高达4万亿美元,对发展努力造成了巨大的打击。
 

Progress in the Millennium

Mahmoud Mohieldin's picture
Progress in the Millennium
The “What Will It Take” campaign let people share their ideas on ending poverty.
​© Simone D. McCourtie/World Bank.

In September 2000, world leaders committed to the Millennium Development Goals.

Until then, few dared to imagine goals such as eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, universalizing access to education or reducing maternal mortality would be possible. Now, with 500 days left before the end of 2015, the MDGs are less a leap of imagination and more of a challenge that many leaders feel is within reach.

How and Why Countries are Changing to Reach Universal Access in Rural Sanitation by 2030

Eddy Perez's picture
Earlier this year, the World Bank partnered with Chile's Ministry of Transport and Telecommunication on a project to innovate technology and mobility solutions: Smart City Gran Concepción. So far, the project has met two milestones, ideation (in January) and formation of a diagnostic and strategic support plan (in March).

Last month, it was time for the project's third phase: a competition to surface new ideas for mass transit options, road safety and mobility information. This event, called the MueveTT Innovation Challenge, brought together 14 teams of people to brainstorm ways for the government, companies, universities, organizations, citizens, and others to work together toward the vision of smart cities.
 

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