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social marketing

Social Marketing Master Class: The Importance of Evaluation

Roxanne Bauer's picture

Social marketing emerged from the realization that marketing principles can be used not just to sell products but also to "sell" ideas, attitudes and behaviors.  The purpose of any social marketing program, therefore, is to change the attitudes or behaviors of a target population-- for the greater social good.

In evaluating social marketing programs, the true test of effectiveness is not the number of flyers distributed or public service announcements aired but how the program impacted the lives of people.

Rebecca Firestone, a social epidemiologist at PSI with area specialties in sexual and reproductive health and non-communicable diseases, walks us through some best practices of social marketing and offers suggestions for improvement in the future.  Chief among her suggestions is the need for more and better evaluation of social marketing programs.


Social Marketing Master Class: The Importance of Evaluation

Campaign Art: Kick Off Your Birthday by Bringing Fresh Water to the Sahel

Roxanne Bauer's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

charity: water, launched its annual "September Campaign" this month in which the organization selects a country or region for targeted support. This year, the Sahel region was chosen, and the September Campaign seeks to bring clean water to 100,000 people of Mali and Niger that are living in the strip of land between the Sahara desert to the north and the Sudanian Savannah to the south.  The area is frequently affected by drought and famine, and access to clean water is rare.

Unlike other nonprofits that speak about the organization and mission first, charity: water puts their supporters at the center of their communications and empowers them to tell personal stories and fundraise individually, using a method known as inbound marketing. Inbound marketing promotes an organization through blogs, video, enewsletters, whitepapers, SEO, and other forms of content marketing which attract the attention of key audiences and draw people to their website. By contrast, buying attention through advertisements, cold-calling, direct paper mail, and radio, are considered "outbound marketing."

Central to their inbound marketing method, charity: water appeals to supporters to start 'your own campaign.' The website offers visitors the ability to, "start a fundraising campaign and bring clean drinking water to people in need around the world." The personalized and social nature of the campaign allows people to share their own stories and encourage friends and followers to do the same. Supporters have been creative with their campaigns, starting birthday fundraisers, running marathons, and welcoming newborns with donations.

   

Social Marketing Master Class: Market Facilitation

Roxanne Bauer's picture
How can a development program work with other actors in a market to provide a product or service? How can we segment a market or use subsidy more effectively?

Social marketing asks questions like these to determine what types of media to use, how to allocate resources, and what the mix and schedule of marketing strategies should be in order to influence how individuals interact with and respond to products and services. It seeks to inform the delivery of competition-sensitive and segmented social change programs.

Rebecca Firestone, a social epidemiologist at PSI with area specialties in sexual and reproductive health and non-communicable diseases, speaks to us about the importance of designing programs that do not just operate in a market but which actively facilitate the market. Ultimately, she says, the goal is to ensure "equitable access to products and services that are going to help people lead healthier lives."

In Myanmar, where the economy is opening up, PSI is working to ensure that the commercial market for condoms is allowed to grow while also finding avenues to deliver condoms to those people who cannot afford them on their own.
 
Market Facilitation
 

There is no such thing as a free… condom: social marketing to prevent HIV/AIDS in Vietnam

Nguyen Thi Mai's picture
Vietnam: Fighting HIV/AIDS Starts with Better Access to Prevention


In the early 1990s, selling condoms was highly controversial in Vietnam. For so long, condoms had been distributed to each household throughout the country for free for family planning use only. Condoms were not used for promoting safe sex. It was extremely difficult to convince the media to advertise condoms, very hard to convince the government that it was possible to generate revenue from selling condoms. People found it embarrassing to buy condoms in shops or drugs stores.