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New Partnership for Capacity Development in Household Surveys for Welfare Analysis

Vini Vaid's picture

In low- and middle-income countries, household surveys are often the primary source of socio-economic data used by decision makers to make informed decisions and monitor national development plans and the SDGs. However, household surveys continue to suffer from low quality and limited cross-country comparability, and many countries lack the necessary resources and know-how to develop and maintain sustainable household survey systems.
 
The World Bank’s Center for Development Data (C4D2) in Rome and the Bank of Italy— with financial support by the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation and commitments from other Italian and African institutions—have launched a new initiative to address these issues.

The Partnership for Capacity Development in Household Surveys for Welfare Analysis aims to improve the quality and sustainability of national surveys by strengthening capacity in regional training centers in the collection, analysis, and use of household surveys and other microdata, as well as in the integration of household surveys with other data sources.
 
On Monday, nine partners signed an MoU describing the intent of the Partnership, at the Bank of Italy in Rome. The signatories included Haishan Fu (Director, Development Data Group, World Bank), Valeria Sannucci (Deputy Governor, Bank of Italy), Pietro Sebastiani (Director General for Cooperation and Development, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of the Italian Republic), Laura Frigenti (Director, Italian Agency for Development Cooperation), Giorgio Alleva (President, Italian National Institute of Statistics), Stefano Vella (Research Manager, Italian National Institute of Health), Oliver Chinganya (Director, African Centre for Statistics of the UN Economic Commission for Africa), Frank Mkumbo (Rector, Eastern Africa Statistical Training Center), and Hugues Kouadio (Director, École Nationale Supérieure de Statistique et d’Économie Appliquée).
 
The Partnership will offer a biannual Training Week on household surveys and thematic workshops on specialized topics to be held in Italy in training facilities made available by the Bank of Italy, as well as regular short courses and seminars held at regional statistical training facilities to maximize outreach and impact. The first of a series of Training-of-Trainers (ToT) courses will be held in Fall 2017.
 
For more information, please contact: c4d2@worldbank.org.

Journalists, economists and making the news

Daphna Berman's picture
Wenceslaus Mushi (center) during a television program.

When Wenceslaus Mushi watches the evening news on the television at his home in Dar es Salaam, he often finds himself shouting out tips to the reporters.  “They aren’t asking the right questions,” says Mushi, a 40-year news veteran and former managing editor of the government-owned Daily News.  

Five innovative education trends from Korea

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Students in Korea (Photo: World Bank)

Education is one of the most powerful instruments for reducing poverty and inequality. It also lays the basis for sustained growth.  Better schooling investments raise national income growth rates.  In nearly all countries, though to varying degrees, educational progress has lagged for groups that are disadvantaged due to low income, gender, disability or ethnic and/or linguistic affiliation.  However, there is an on-going education revolution occurring. 

Swedish firms provide training and consider an inadequately educated workforce as the major obstacle to their operations

Silvia Muzi's picture
The private sector is a critical driver of job creation and economic growth. However, several factors can undermine private enterprise and, if left unresolved, may blunt growth. Through rigorous face-to-face interviews with managers and owners of private firms, the World Bank Group’s Enterprise Surveys benchmark the business environment in countries, based on the direct experiences of firms.
 
This blog is based on the Sweden Enterprise Survey (ES), which covered 600 firms across 4 regions and 6 business sectors.


Gender equality is one of the cornerstones of modern Swedish society. In the workplace, however, women are still underrepresented at the upper levels of corporate responsibility and decision-making, especially in the private sector. While women constitute more than one-third of the country’s private sector workforce, they account for only 23% of all managers—with an even smaller percentage of top managers. In 2013, when the Sweden Enterprise Survey was conducted, only 12% of firms in Sweden were led by a top woman manager.
 

Meaty issues on the radio

BBC Media Action's picture

Ehizogie Ohiani, a Producer/Trainer for BBC Media Action in Nigeria, discusses how radio is raising awareness about the lack of hygiene amongst the butchers of Benue State, Nigeria.

A meal without meat is as good as no meal for most people in Benue State, North Central Nigeria. Considering its importance, one would expect that hygiene surrounding the preparation and sale of meat would be held in the same high esteem. This is not the case.

A murky mix of flies, blood, water, muddy walkways, sweaty bodies and smoke combine to make the abattoirs in the marketplaces of Benue State a perfect breeding ground for disease. Lack of adequate sanitation knowledge, lack of enforcement by market associations and insufficient supervision of animal slaughter by qualified veterinary officers conspire to create major health challenges for communities.

I was at Harvest FM, a local radio station in Benue State, to train producers. We were brainstorming ways we could use their popular early morning show “Good Morning Benue” to help serve the public interest. For the producers, an obvious choice was to discuss hygiene in abattoirs.

The programme explored a number of problems in the state’s local abattoirs: an absence of toilet and handwashing facilities and the practice of washing meat with untreated water sourced direct from the River Benue.

Smackdown: Provide the people of Africa with training, or with cold, hard cash?

David Evans's picture

In recent years, growing evidence supports the value of cash transfers. Research demonstrates that cash transfers lead to productive investments (in Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia), that they improve human capital investments for children (in Burkina Faso, Tanzania, Lesotho, Zambia, and Malawi), and that they don’t get spent on alcohol (all over the world).

At the same time, the vast majority of governments invest large sums in training programs, whether business training for entrepreneurs or vocational training for youth, with the goal of helping to increase incomes and opportunities.

Africa Impact Evaluation Podcast: Economic Empowerment of Young Women in Africa #AfricaBigIdeas


When it comes to helping young women in Africa with both economic and social opportunity, what does the evidence tell us?  Broadcaster Georges Collinet sat down with researchers and policymakers to discuss the hard evidence behind two programs that have succeeded in giving girls a better chance at getting started in their adult lives.

#2 from 2013: Challenges for India’s Livelihood Youth Skill Development in Rural Areas

Abhilaksh Likhi's picture

Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2013
This post was originally published on July 2, 2013


A critical element in India’s 12th Five Year Plan (2012-2017) is the generation of productive and gainful employment on a sufficient scale. The aim of such planning is to systematically absorb the growing working population in the unorganized sector of an expanding economy. This sector contributes about sixty percent of the country’s GDP. Infact, it employs workers in micro enterprises, unpaid family work, casual labor and home based work on a mammoth scale. In addition, it also absorbs migrant laborers, farmers, artisans and more importantly out of school rural youth.

In the last decade, the Indian economy has witnessed a structural transformation from agricultural activities to manufacturing and services oriented activities. A distinct feature of this transition has been a substantial decline in the absolute number of people employed in agriculture. However, according to the Planning Commission, a crucial factor in the migration of the labor force from rural to urban areas is its temporary nature and occurrence only in lean agricultural seasons. Besides, this large chunk of labor force is not available to participate in the manufacturing or the services oriented activities due to severe lack of appropriate skill sets. According to the Commission, the latter reflects rural distress, driven by the fact, that more than eighty percent of India’s farming households are small and marginal, tilling only less than 2.5 acres of land.

Working With New Partners to Build Skills in Africa

Sajitha Bashir's picture

While global economic growth has been sluggish in recent years, Africa has been growing. We’ve seen a resurgence of traditional sectors such as agriculture and the extractive industries as well as promising new ones such as ICT. Not surprisingly, these booming sectors need highly skilled technicians, engineers, medical workers, agricultural scientists and researchers. Yet large numbers of African graduates remain unemployed as their skills are often not in line with industry requirements. 

Catalyzing Open Government in Afghanistan: Focusing on Poverty Reduction and Shared Prosperity

Gazbiah Rahaman's picture

What does open data and development mean for Afghanistan?

Last November, the first open data mission revealed Afghans’ interest and commitment to foster knowledge sharing, collaboration and openness for a broader and targeted engagement in Afghanistan. In my blog, Afghanistan’s First Open Data Dialogue Delivers, I described my first-hand experience on Afghans enthusiasm about improving data dissemination, national dialogue and partnership between users and producers of statistics, and the drive for more effective aid and technical assistance through better coordination and alignment to the agreed National Statistical Plans.


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