Syndicate content

US Federal Reserve

Quote of the week: Ben Bernanke

Sina Odugbemi's picture

Ben Bernanke“Individually rational behaviour can be collectively irrational. And that’s why the regulators have to do what they can to constrain individual behaviour, so that it doesn’t lead to collectively irrational outcomes.”
 

- Ben Bernanke, an American economist currently working at the Brookings Institution. He served two terms as chairman of the Federal Reserve, the central bank of the United States, from 2006 to 2014. During his time as chairman, Bernanke oversaw the Federal Reserve's response to the late-2000s financial crisis. Bernanke wrote in his 2015 book, The Courage to Act, that the world's economy came close to collapse in 2007 and 2008 and that it was only the innovative efforts of the Federal Reserve, in cooperation with other agencies and agencies of foreign governments, that prevented an economic disaster greater than the Great Depression.  Prior to serving as chairman of the Federal Reserve, Bernanke was a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 2002-2005 and proposed the Bernanke Doctrine concerning the source of deflation.  

Aid, MDGs, and Gender

Swati Mishra's picture

'Development aid’ is always surrounded by questions. Some argue whether it shows results, and some worry about the way it is spent. And the imminent question is, where does it go? Well, it does have some impact. According to the latest UNESCO report ‘Financing Education in Sub-Saharan Africa’, development aid accounts for 50% of the government education budget in some countries of Africa. “Over the last decade public spending on education in Africa has increased by more than 6% each year”, says the report. However, much remains to be done to distribute it well between primary and higher education, as often requirements of the primary education system suffer. Thus, cutting aid is definitely not a smart move as explained by Liz Allcock and Jimmy Kainja in their post ‘Cutting UK aid to Malawi will hurt the poor, not the leaders’.