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Weekly Wire: The Global Forum

Roxanne Bauer's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Could Mobile Phones Save Millions From Illiteracy?
Forbes
According to UNESCO, the answer is yes. Or at least, they could help. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization periodically publishes detailed report about mobile phones usage in some of the poorest regions of the world. This time, for the study Reading in the Mobile Age, the organization tried to understand not only if people in developing countries use mobiles at all, but also, if they use them in a way that could help fight illiteracy. The research found out that, while mobile phones are still used primarily for basic communication, they are also, increasingly, a gateway to long-form text. Often, for millions, the only chance of reading a text where books are almost unknown.


Press Freedom at the Lowest Level in a Decade
Freedom House
While there were positive developments in a number of countries, most notably in sub-Saharan Africa, the dominant trends were reflected in setbacks in a range of settings. The year’s declines were driven by the desire of governments— articularly in authoritarian states or polarized political environments—to control news content, whether through the physical harassment of journalists covering protest movements or other sensitive news stories; restrictions on foreign reporters; or tightened constraints on online news outlets and social media. In addition, press freedom in a number of countries was threatened by private owners—especially those with close connections to governments or ruling parties—who altered editorial lines or dismissed key staff after acquiring previously independent outlets.

Survie de l’enfant: Un impératif des systèmes de santé

Cristian Baeza's picture


La semaine dernière, l’Inde, l’Éthiopie et les États-Unis organisés un Sommet pour des actions concrètes en faveur de la survie de l’enfant, avec la participation de représentants venus du monde entier. Cet événement est à la fois opportun et fondamental : l’enjeu est de renforcer davantage les engagements pris sur le plan national et international ainsi que la responsabilité des pays dans la réalisation du quatrième objectif du Millénaire pour le développement (OMD), qui vise à réduire la mortalité infantile. Si de nombreux progrès ont été accomplis dans ce domaine, il est des pays qui risquent de ne pas remplir cet objectif à l'horizon 2015 et qui ont le plus besoin de notre soutien et de notre coopération.

Supervivencia infantil: Un imperativo de los sistemas de salud

Cristian Baeza's picture

Child Survival Call to Action

La semana pasada, los Gobiernos de India, Etiopía y Estados Unidos organizaron una Cumbre de Llamamiento a la Acción para la Supervivencia Infantil, con la participación de líderes mundiales y nacionales. Se trata de un evento oportuno y fundamental, destinado a fortalecer aún más el compromiso mundial y de los países y la responsabilidad de estos en el logro del objetivo de desarrollo del milenio (ODM) 4: reducir la mortalidad infantil. Aunque hemos observado una mejora sustancial en esta meta, los países que requie renmás de nuestro apoyo y asociación podrían no alcanzarla para 2015.

Child survival: A health systems imperative

Cristian Baeza's picture

Child Survival Call to Action

This week, the governments of India, Ethiopia and the United States will host a Child Survival Call to Action summit, with the participation of country and global leaders. This is a timely and critical event, aimed at further strengthening global and country commitment and country accountability for MDG4, to reduce child mortality. Though we’ve seen substantial improvement on this goal, the countries that need our support and partnership most may not reach it by 2015.