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youth employment

Jobs Crisis in the Middle East & North Africa

Nigel Twose's picture

From 14 – 24 January, I visited Lebanon, the Palestinian territories and Tunisia. It is a region that has some of the greatest challenges when it comes to creating jobs. Finding solutions to the jobs crisis in the MENA region is key to solving many of the other issues that are holding back the region’s development.

 A furniture factory near Gaza City. Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank

New insights for Entra21 in Cordoba

Guillermo Cruces's picture

The past decade has wrought numerous studies on youth training programs, especially in Latin America and the Caribbean. However, little research exists on they operate and their effects beyond the labor market. We spoke with Guillermo Cruces, of the Center for Distributive, Labor and Social Studies (CEDLAS) at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, about the Center's efforts to fill this hole by studying the Entra21 program in Cordoba in 2011-12.

Students in rural Argentina. Photo: Flickr@WorldBank (Nahuel Berger)

The shape of future jobs

Nigel Twose's picture

Between now and 2030, countries all over the world will have to create about 600 million jobs just to absorb the expanding working age population – while simultaneously coping with a number of daunting challenges. Against this backdrop, the World Economic Forum’s Global Council on the Future of Jobs — in which I participate — is launching a survey of 2,000 firms to learn how they anticipate major trends will shape the labor market in their industry by 2020.

Nukua'lofa, Tonga. Photo: Flickr@WorldBank (Tom Perry)

The Importance of Good Governments for Youth Employment

Diane LuTran's picture
World Bank Group Youth Summit 2014
For more details on the World Bank Group
Youth Summit and how to apply, click here.
The role of government to address youth unemployment is crucial as they provide the "enabling environment" for youth to thrive. Governments operate as a nexus between policy and practice, and addressing the socio-economic problems impacting youth, such as unemployment and barriers to political participation is essential for youth progress and development [...]

The World Bank is providing a space to discuss these issues and more at the upcoming Youth Summit, which will be held Oct. 7 in Washington, D.C.

Meeting the Youth Employment Challenge in Africa – Six Myths

Louise Fox's picture

Youth empowerment in Liberia. Photo credit: Flickr @CAFOD

As the world's youngest and poorest region, Sub-Saharan Africa faces a major jobs challenge. Half of the population is under 25, and every year 11 million people enter the labor force — mostly youth looking for work. After more than a decade of rapid growth and expansion of educational opportunities, youth have high aspirations and expectations, and African policy makers are concerned about how to meet them. Jobs and opportunity are at the top of the development agenda.

Jim Yong Kim: Turkey's Decade of Progress

Jim Yong Kim's picture

ISTANBUL — On my first trip to Turkey, I met the country's political leaders, business executives, and civil society organizers — and some of the World Bank Group staff. We have 250 staff in Turkey, of which 200 are in the regional hub of IFC, our private sector arm.

While Turkey faces many challenges, I came away very impressed with many of the nation's accomplishments during the last decade. To learn more, watch this video blog.

Targeting Youth to Reduce South Africa’s Unemployment

Ingrid Woolard's picture

IT training for kids who live in the surrounding farm areas of Stutterheim outside East London in the Eastern Cape. South Africa. Photo: Trevor Samson / World Bank

Globally youth are, on average, nearly three times more likely to be unemployed than older adults. In South Africa this problem has been exacerbated by the global downturn. When the economy slowed down, youth unemployment began to rise sooner than adult unemployment, suggesting that younger people are more vulnerable to changing economic conditions. The question arises whether interventions should focus on youth among the unemployed. I would argue that interventions should specifically target youth, as they face some significant barriers to entering the labor market.

Tunisia to Pilot Biometric ID Cards for Youth Job Programs

Mohsen Bentouati's picture

In Tunisia, around 40 percent of youth are unemployed, many of them with only a secondary education or less. To help them find jobs, the government is undertaking a comprehensive reform of its active labor market programs. The JKP recently spoke with Mohsen Bentouati—Sub-Director of Employment Programs, Ministry of Vocational Training and Employment—about the planned introduction of a biometric identification card. It will be used to monitor the operation of the programs, the use of services, and to make payments, along with ensuring that the people targeted are those most likely to benefit.

Youth training and internships in Kenya

Alice Githu's picture

Kenya has high unemployment and under-employment, but the jobless rate for youth is much higher than that for adults. For that reason, a pilot project—part of the Kenya Youth Empowerment Project (KYEP)—is under way to address the lack of skills and work experience for unemployed youth (aged 15-29). We spoke with the KYEP’s coordinator, Alice Githu (Senior Youth Development Officer, Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports). She says that one key lesson is the need to offer life skills training on top of core business skills. Another is the importance of private sector involvement.