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Youth

Night life in #Africa: a fun twist to development

Maleele Choongo's picture
Agendakar is a web platform that connects users to local night life, restaurants, exhibitions, and other events in Dakar. Deme’s Agendakar is now the most popular event guide to Senegal's capital. Her staff of four young Africans collect event dates, program, code, and write articles about the city’s latest novelties. The app reduces costs associated with mobile web services by allowing users to download it for free and use it offline.

Campaign Art: We Are Behind You Toward #ZeroPoverty2030

Roxanne Bauer's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

The fight against poverty has experienced incredible gains over the last two decades as the share of people living in extreme poverty was cut in half worldwide, from 43% in 1990 to under 20% today.  However, this still leaves more than one billion people living on less than $1.25 per day! 

The following video by Global Citizen was shared at a World Bank event, #EndPoverty 2030: Millennials Take on the Challenge, in which “Millennial” leaders called on young people to help make this generation the first in history to end extreme poverty. The event featured inspiring voices and stories of young leaders taking on critical issues – from entrepreneurship to education to gender equality. It built excitement and support, as well as catalyzed action, around the goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030.
 
We Are Behind You Toward #ZeroPoverty2030

If You Could Help End Extreme Poverty, Would You? We Can. Let's Take It On.

Ravi Kumar's picture
#TakeOn

 
Talent is everywhere, but opportunities are not. That’s the conventional belief.

Today, after listening to some amazing young people speak about their lives at Thursday’s End Poverty event at the World Bank, I’m convinced that opportunities are omnipresent.

These youth have one thing in common: They all want to take on poverty and want everyone else to join them. For the first time in history, we can end extreme poverty, and we can do it by 2030. It’s the right thing to do.

Confucius, a Chinese philosopher who lived in the fifth century B.C., said that when we are faced with what’s right, “to leave it undone shows a lack of courage.” Today, four inspiring youth leaders were at the World Bank Group in Washington, D.C. to do what is right by helping to launch a global movement to end extreme poverty by 2030.

One of them, Chernor Bah, was born during a civil war in the slums of Freetown, the capital city of Sierra Leone. Access to basic needs such as food was a privilege for him. His mom’s resilience helped him get education, he passionately told an energetic, youthful crowd. When he grew up he took it upon himself to mobilize young people to help increase access to education. Today he serves as the chairman of the Youth Advocacy Group for the Global Education First Initiative. Its goal is “to accelerate progress towards the Education for All goals and the education-related Millennium Development Goals.”

Aspiring to Understand Aspirations

Scott Abrahams's picture

The following post is a part of a series that discusses 'mind and culture,' the theme of the World Bank’s upcoming World Development Report 2015.

In Ethiopia, 3% of students will go to college.* But how many would you guess say that they want to?

The answer is 75%. That is how many of the 14 to 15 year-olds surveyed by the Young Lives team out of Oxford said they would like to complete a university degree. Of those kids, 9 in 10 expect to get there.

New technology changes the working day, offering a strategy for more jobs in the Middle East

Kara Schoeffling's picture
  Arne Hoel

It’s no secret that the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has the highest youth unemployment rate in the entire world: nearly 30% according to the International Labour Organization. Over one in four young people have no viable means for economic prosperity, and sadly education is no guarantor of a job. Despite these bleak statistics, a recent survey commissioned by Qatar’s telecom giant, Orredoo, suggests that young people still have hope of a great future, fueled in large part by the innovations of the 21st century. The challenge is to innovate technology and alter our way of thinking about work to motivate MENA’s youth.
 

Expanding the Global Youth Agenda beyond Jobs

Gloria La Cava's picture
Young man from MENA

Youth exclusion- is a challenge of staggering proportions in the post-2015 development agenda. Since 2011, disenchantment among the largest youth cohort in history has channeled itself into movements challenging the status quo in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), Europe, and Latin America. Popular protests have been called not just for jobs but for changing the old order, for a voice on policies that impact the future of youth, and for justice, freedom and dignity. 

Among Almond Blossoms and Olive Groves on the Abraham Path: How Hiking in Palestine Creates Jobs for Women and Youth

Stefanie Ridenour's picture
Among Almond Blossoms and Olive Groves on the Abraham Path

Among the olive groves, almond blossoms, lush grass, and views of small towns nestled on hilltops and in valleys, World Bank colleagues and I hiked a trail in northern Palestine. Ducking into cool, dark, ancient aqueducts used by civilizations centuries ago, we paused for tea brewed by our local guide in a kettle over an open flame. A homemade meal by a local family topped off our trek. 

What’s the Relationship between Youth, Open Government, and Development?

Felipe Estefan's picture
Youth demand openness
Percentage of youth who said they want their government to be more open. Source: Global Opening Government Survey

We live in a time unlike any other in our history.
 
Today, many more of us have more tools to more quickly exchange more knowledge and expertise than ever before.
 

Look Who Has a Megaphone!

Roxanne Bauer's picture

In an interview on TN TV Channel, Argentina in November 2013 Pope Francis said that, “Today we are living in an unjust international system in which ‘King Money’ is at the center.” He continued, “It is a throwaway culture that discards young people as well as its older people. In some European countries, without mentioning names, there is youth unemployment of 40 percent and higher.”

It seems Pope Francis has heard the rallying calls from youth around the world.

In 2010, youth in Mozambique staged protests in Maputo and Matola against rising food prices.

The ‘Geração à Rasca’ (Scraping-by Generation) of Portugal took to the streets in March 2011 as a spontaneous Facebook event to call attention to underemployment, lack of social protection, and unemployment that many experience.

Youth protests flared in Sao Paulo, Brazil in June and September of 2013 in reaction to high unemployment, low-paying jobs, inflation, and the high cost of living in big cities.

And just a month ago, around 2,000 unemployed Moroccans marched through their capital in January 2014 to demand jobs, a particularly thorny problem for university graduates.

The more famous protests of Arab Spring, the Occupy Movement and the Gezi Park protests in Turkey were also spurred, in part, by young people.

The quality of education in MENA: Some good news

Farrukh Iqbal's picture
 Some good news

In some respects, the Middle East and North Africa region has a very strong record in the area of education.  For example, if we rank countries by increases in the average number of years of schooling between 1980 and 2010, nine of the top twenty are from the MENA region. This good performance in the quantity of education stands in sharp contrast to the comparatively weak performance of the region in sustaining high economic growth over the last three decades.

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