Syndicate content

Agriculture and Rural Development

Building a More Resilient, Livable Community in the Mekong Delta

Rachel Kyte's picture
_


I am standing on the shore of Bến Tre Province in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam. One of the first questions is, would I be able to stand here in a few months’ time?
 
If you look just a few hundred meters out to sea, that was cultivable land up to three years ago. In the last three years this village has lost half of its land. Sea incursion is just one of the complex challenges that the authorities and the people who live in the Mekong Delta have to juggle at the same time. So the Mekong Delta, the decisions that are made here are affected by the upstream decisions of hydroelectric planning, irrigation, and other freshwater use. By the time the water gets here, some of that freshwater which is needed is no longer available.

This Week in #SouthAsiaDev: August 22, 2014

Mary Ongwen's picture
We've rounded up 17 tweets, posts, links, and +1's on South Asia-related development news, innovation and social good that caught our eye this week. Countries included: Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and, Sri Lanka.

In Latin America, Hard Hats and Tools are no longer only for Men

Maria Margarita Nunez's picture

Women that have joined road maintenance has increased significantly.

While driving around rural areas of Puno in Peru, Caaguazú in Paraguay or Granada in Nicaragua, do not be surprised to see women lifting rocks from the roads and using shovels and picks alongside men.  In fact, in the past 15 years, the number of women that have joined organizations in charge of routine road maintenance in Latin America has increased significantly and with this their life conditions have improved dramatically.

Five Reasons Why Youth Should Choose Agriculture

Andy Shuai Liu's picture
What type of career do you aspire to have? Do you want to be an artist, a business person, or a policymaker?
 
Or, have you ever wanted to become a farmer? I would not be surprised if you said no.
 

Competitiveness is Key to Trade and Development in Africa

Anabel Gonzalez's picture
Textile factories are an important source of employment in Lesotho, which benefits from the AGOA agreement. Photo credit: John Hogg / World Bank. As World Bank President Jim Kim told the African leaders who gathered in Washington for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit this week: African countries have enormous potential to increase trade, drive growth, reduce poverty, and deliver jobs. They face constraints, to be sure, but the World Bank Group is working with our African partners daily to improve the competitiveness of their industries and boost the volume and diversity of their trade with the rest of the world.

At a high-level meeting at the World Bank on Monday, African ministers and delegations representing 51 countries had a pressing concern: the renewal and modernization of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). A preferential program that enhances the access of qualifying African countries to the US market, the law is due to expire in September 2015.

August 1, 2014: This Week in #SouthAsiaDev

Mary Ongwen's picture
We've rounded up 20 tweets, posts, links, and +1's on South Asia-related development news, innovation and social good that caught our eye this week. Countries included:Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and, Sri Lanka.

For rural communities, good roads mean the world

Maria Margarita Nunez's picture

Coffee beans in the hands of a Peruvian farmer.

On a Friday evening last November, twelve mayors from nearby districts gathered at the municipal office building in Tarapoto, Peru. Even though the rainy season was just ramping-up in this lush tropical area of the country, local roads were already being washed away. These mayors were eagerly planning for the local Provincial Road Institute to use their tractors to protect their roads to counter the negative effects of the rain.
One of them cried out, “How will my people bring grapes and coffee to local markets without good roads? Our products are going to rot and my people are going to suffer.”

How avocados are changing the way of life of Peruvian farmers

Maria Margarita Nunez's picture
Recently planted avocado trees in the Alto Laran district, in Peru.
Recently planted avocado trees in the Alto Laran district, in Peru.

A five hours’ drive south of Lima lays the coastal provinces of Chincha. If one heads inland into the deserted mountains that are typical of costal Peru, one would be surprised to find agriculture blanketing the valley floor. For centuries local communities in these rugged terrains have been using water from small meandering streams to grow maize, and eke out a living by selling surpluses at nearby markets. However, in recent years the growth of industrial agriculture has squeezed these communities, making it hard for them to survive in these ancestral lands, forcing many of them to move to nearby cities such as Chincha Alta.

What Will the Trade Facilitation Agreement Mean for the Aid for Trade Agenda? New e-Book Provides Answers

Jaime de Melo's picture

The world’s 45 Least Developed Countries that are not oil producers (non-oil LDCs) are exporting less and less in the global market place. Between 1985 and 2012, the world market share of non-oil LDCs’ exports of goods and services fell from 1.2 percent to 0.8 percent—all while their share in world population rose from 7.5 percent to 9.9 percent.

The 2005 Aid for Trade (AFT) initiative was designed to arrest this decline. Yet, LDCs’ trade costs continue to fall less rapidly than those of their competitors.

Clearly, it’s time to re-evaluate the AFT initiative.

A new e-book does just that, and, contrary to what some may think, concludes that the initiative has been beneficial. But due to a collective failure to clearly articulate its results, the achievements of the AFT initiative are now at risk as development budgets come under increasing pressure.


Pages