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Agriculture and Rural Development

IFC Ag Chief Oscar Chemerinski on DM2008

Tom Grubisich's picture

Oscar Chemerinski, Director of the Agribusiness Department at the International Finance Corp. -- the commercial development arm of the World Bank Group -- gave this mini-interview at DM2008:

Q. What's your reaction to what you see on the floor among the booths of the hundred finalists?

Why GEF Is Backing DM2008

Tom Grubisich's picture

Monique Barbut, CEO and Chairwoman of the Global Environment Facility -- the largest funder of projects to improve the global environment and one of the funders of Development Markektplace 2008 -- talked about GEF's role in the grant competition.

Q. GEF deals with multimillion-dollar programs. DM2008's projects are in the $200,000 or less range. Why are they important to GEF?

Small Scale, but Potential Big Payoffs

Tom Grubisich's picture

Less-developed countries need many things – but, in most cases, nothing greater or more urgent than productive agriculture. Most of the world’s poorest people -- the 2.6 billion who try to survive on less than $2 a day – are family farmers whose small plots are unproductive and generally cut off from growing export markets. If these families could make the leap from subsistence to market-driven farming, world poverty would decline exponentially. It’s a big "if."

Cambodia's Relative Peace Brings the Challenges of Growth

Stéphane Guimbert's picture

Workers scale one of the skyscrapers under construction in Cambodia.
Last Sunday, more than 8 millions Cambodians were called to vote. This is already the fourth general elections since the 1991 Paris Peace Agreement. Many – including me before I moved to our Phnom Penh office last summer – still connect Cambodia first to what we learned in history classes. The splendor of the Angkor civilization and the atrocities of the Khmer Rouge regime probably come on top of the list. And there is some truth to that. Angkor Wat and its neighboring temples remain magnificent. The Khmer Rouge regime has left deep stigma for the people and for the society. The Khmer Rouge tribunal is attracting a lot of international attention as well. Most landmine fields have been cleared, although there remain some in more remote areas.

But, for all this, this connection more and more misses a key fact: over the last couple of years, Cambodia has achieved a relative peace that has enabled dramatic social and economic change.


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