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Education

Quality education needed to boost women’s economic empowerment

Keiko Inoue's picture
Better educated women secure brighter futures for themselves and lift entire households out of poverty.



While Hillary Clinton is cracking the glass ceiling, if not yet shattering it entirely, in the United States by becoming the first female presidential nominee of a major political party, recent analysis on U.S. women in the workforce presents a more sobering finding.

Chart: Girls Closing The Education Gap in IDA Countries

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Since 1990, primary school completion rates in countries supported by the International Development Association (IDA) have risen by over 50%. The gap between girls and boys completion remains, but it’s fallen by 70% since 1990 and is now smaller than ever.
 

Preparing great primary school teachers is not so elementary

Betsy Brown Ruzzi's picture
High-performing systems set rigorous standards for becoming a teacher in order to ensure that only the most qualified individuals enter classrooms

 
Ed's note: This guest blog is by Betsy Brown Ruzzi of the National Center on Education and the Economy (NCEE).

Developing teachers with a deep understanding of the content they teach underpins the success of primary schools in top-performing education systems.  This is one of the key findings in a new report recently released by the National Center on Education and the Economy’s Center on International Education Benchmarking, Not So Elementary: Primary School Teacher Quality in Top-Performing Systems.

The significance of Int’l Youth Day in 2016

Anne Elicaño's picture
Students on campus. Photo: Nafise Motlaq / World Bank


There is plenty to celebrate about being a young person. Since 1999, the United Nations commemorates the ideas and initiatives of young people everywhere with International Youth Day. To me, it’s particularly significant this year because it’s the first International Youth Day since the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, were adopted (last September 2015).

The SDGs aim to address “the root causes of poverty and the universal need for development that works for all people” by 2030. Fourteen years from now may seem like a distant dream but it’s really not that far ahead. Today’s 16 year old will be 30 by then and  whatever foundations are laid down today will inevitably impact his/her world forever. 

Youth and peacebuilding one act at a time

Bassam Sebti's picture


Aristotle once said “Good habits formed at youth make all the difference,” and what a difference a group of young Lebanese men and women are making to advocate for peace to make a difference!

Their ages range between 16 to 25 years old. They are poor and unemployed. They once fought each other, literally, in their sectarian-divided Lebanese city of Tripoli. Sunni residents of Bab al-Tabbaneh and Alawite residents of Jabal Mohsen neighborhoods fought each other repeatedly.

But at the beginning of 2015, the government imposed a ceasefire that put an end to the endless rounds of fierce clashes and restored calm in the city.

And that’s when a Lebanese non-profit organization promoting peace through art went there looking for a different kind of recruitment: one of peace. March brought the youth together to perform in a play!

Progress creates opportunities to address exclusion: Observations from the 4th LGBTI Human Rights Conference

Nicholas Menzies's picture
Foto: Andrés Scagliola, Intendencia de Montevideo
Photo: Andrés Scagliola, City of Montevideo

While many of the struggles that LGBTI people face are all too familiar – violence, stigma, discrimination – we’ve just returned from the fourth Global LGBTI Human Rights Conference in Uruguay full of stories of positive change.  We’re invigorated about the increasing potential for the Bank to be a valuable partner to our clients and LGBTI citizens around the world.

Trends in returns to schooling: why governments should invest more in people’s skills

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Students at a training center.

One of the biggest economic benefits of schooling are labor market earnings. For many people, education and experience are their only assets. This is why I believe that it’s very important to know the economic benefits of investments in schooling.

The jobs challenges of urbanization in India and Pakistan

Michael Kugelman's picture
Michael Kugelman, guest blogger, is the senior associate for South Asia at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC.
A busy train station in Mumbai, India. Photo: Simone D. McCourtie / World Bank

India and Pakistan are urbanizing at remarkably rapid rates. India’s urban population has increased from less than 20 percent of its overall population in 1951 to more than 30 percent today. In Pakistan, the share of the urban population—well under 20 percent in the 1960s, is more than a third today.


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