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South Asia Regional DM Grant Competition - Deadline Approaching

Aaron Leonard's picture


The South Asia Regional Development Marketplace is accepting proposals under the theme: “Family and Community Approaches to Improve Infant and Young Child Nutrition.” Proposals are welcomed from all South Asian countries including: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.  See the call for proposals for further eligibility criteria.

Proposals are being accepted until March 31, 2009.  About 70 of the most promising candidates will be invited to present their ideas at the South Asia Regional Marketplace event to be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh in August 4-6, 2009.  Of these, up to 25 winners will be selected by a jury of distinguished nutrition and development experts, to receive awards of up to US$40,000.

For more information, visit their website at http://go.worldbank.org/OC44S3YCY0.

Slumdog Millionaires!

Saptarshi Pal's picture

Indiscriminate littering of plastic bags clogs up Kolkata’s street drains which results in water-logging in several areas of the city. During monsoons, the city almost comes to a standstill! Some city environmentalists are petitioning the municipal authorities to ban the widespread use of plastic bags in the city, also because the toxic material remains in the soil for years. However, plastic bags have become an indispensable part of our daily life. They have several advantages, including being cost effective, and hence a “ban” on plastic bags is not working.

The End of AIDS?

Once somebody asked me why we can’t eradicate malaria by treating every person in malaria-endemic countries with an effective ant-malarial drug at the same time. As long as they all stay on the drug for as long as it takes for the current generation of infected mosquitoes to die (1-2 weeks on average, maybe a month maximum), then the human reservoir will be eliminated, no new mosquitoes will become infected, and that would be the end of malaria.

Of Women and Wealth

Stacy Alcantara's picture

Three hundred and thirty three years of Hispanic rule have drastically transformed the Philippines from a society that used to offer equal opportunities for women to a strongly patriarchal one.  Before the Spaniards conquered the Philippines, women were pretty much allowed to do what traditional patriarchal societies have boxed up as “man’s work.”  In short, women could become heads of their families or villages, they could earn properties like land and cattle, and if they were born into a ruling a family, they didn’t need to get married to succeed their parents’ throne.


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