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Labor and Social Protection

Tourism: a ‘win-win’ sector to promote recovery & employment in the Middle East & North Africa

Peter McConaghy's picture
        World Bank

From the pyramids showcasing the world’s first great civilization, to the sandy white beaches of the southern Mediterranean, religious sites and pristine eco-reserves, the Middle East and North Africa region is chock full of unique tourist attractions. Tourism in MENA does not only satisfy the hedonistic wishes of vacationers – it is an important sector for economic development and job creation.

Beware the macroeconomic iceberg hiding in unchartered political waters

Caroline Freund's picture
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

As Arab countries mark the two-year anniversaries of their revolutions, economic challenges remain sharp, and the current political and policy uncertainty make it difficult to forecast how growth will evolve over the longer run. One way to reduce some of the guesswork is to look at what has typically happened in other transitions. In a recent paper, we identified and examined 90 attempts at transition from autocracy to democracy that took place over the last half century.

The Arab Spring: an opportunity for financial inclusion?

Guest Blogger's picture
        Photo Credit: Yavuz Saryildiz

The end of 2011 was undeniably a momentous time across the Arab World with uprisings first emerging in Tunisia and Egypt and then spreading to Libya, Yemen, and Syria. Expectations of 2012 were high as old regimes were discarded and new governments brought with them hopes of more equitable societies and opportunities for all.

The virtual tribe: community of practitioners explores employment & safety nets in MENA

Amina Semlali's picture
        Javier Santos

Tune in for the live streaming of a virtual knowledge sharing forum on the topic of jobs on January 16 and January 17 at 8:30 AM EST (3:30 PM Istanbul time). This is a unique opportunity for anyone interested in this issue to connect with experts and top-level practitioners with just a few clicks. Participate in the debate, ask questions and share your views!

Welcome to The Trade Post

Mona Haddad's picture

A trading post from the old west. Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/reservatory3/Welcome to The Trade Post, the World Bank’s new blog on international trade. Here, our trade experts will share their research, observations and questions. We will post when a new, interesting trade study is published or when a solution to one country’s trade policy issue might be applicable to others. We will discuss data, trends and complex ideas. But, above all, our goal is to make our work accessible and understandable, and we hope to engage a wide audience.

Some of our past blogging – originally published elsewhere in the World Bank– can be found here in our archive. We have remarked on the ways extreme flooding in Thailand exposed the vulnerability of supply chains, pointed out political hurdles to infrastructure planning in Africa, and described Indonesia’s efforts to make its main port more efficient. We believe that, while some of the issues we address are technical, we find them fascinating and we should be able to explain them to any layperson willing to listen.

Two years on, a wake-up call for Tunisia

Heba Elgazzar's picture
        World Bank

January 14 marks two years to the day since the Tunisian uprising of 2011 and on the outside, things are moving in the right direction. Democratic elections, the drafting of a new constitution and new-found freedoms are examples that change has come. But within Tunisia, there is growing skepticism that the demands of the revolution have not been met.

Haiti: top five wishes for 2013

Hasan Tuluy's picture

También disponible en español y francés

Three years after the earthquake, Haiti has made gains in key development areas including education, the economic environment and managing the risk of natural hazards. In this video blog, World Bank regional Vice President Hasan Tuluy shares his top five wishes for Haiti in 2013.

Social protection in Iraq: towards social inclusion and investing in human capital

Ghassan Alkhoja's picture
       

The key human development challenge for Iraq is to continue to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of its human development sectors. This will involve introducing policies that enable the human development sectors to work together strategically with the common, long-term aim of developing Iraq’s human capital. Social protection will play a critical role in this process.

Business regulations in Lebanon: where are we? where do we go now?

Jamal Ibrahim Haidar's picture
                      World Bank | Emad Abd El Hady

During my time in Lebanon last summer, I convinced a close friend, Maroun, to start a small manufacturing firm for producing soap and shampoo. Eventually, he got the business off the ground, but there is no such thing as a free lunch. I witnessed the pain that Maroun had to go through to formally register and set up his business.

Growing Older, Working Longer

Tehani Ariyaratne's picture

Courtesy Centre for Poverty AnalysisOn Jan. 7 from 2-4 p.m., there will be a live chat on Sri Lanka's aging population at facebook.com/worldbanksrilanka. Tehani Ariyaratne, from the Centre for Poverty Analysis, will be joining the chat. Here, she discusses her recent work on the subject.

The Centre for Poverty Analysis recently put the finishing touches on a photo documentary portraying an oft-forgotten side in the discussion on demographic transitions and the elderly: productivity.

In Sri Lanka, an individual above the age of 60 is considered 'elderly'. Our documentary focussed on individuals in two districts, Hambantota and Batticaloa, and captures a diverse, rural elderly population. During the course of our fieldwork, we met and spoke with many individuals about their ideas regarding the benefits of and constraints to maintaining an active lifestyle.


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