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Poverty

A peek at the media coverage of SDGs: What is it telling us?

Mauricio Ríos's picture

Pope Arrives in General Assembly Hall for His AddressThe United Nations General Assembly recently adopted the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in New York in the midst of great expectation and hype. The 17 SDGs, with 169 specific targets, are now becoming the road map for governments and the international development community for the next 15 years.

Now that all the publicity and excitement are starting to settle down, it seems opportune to look at the media coverage of the SDGs and developing countries to get a sense of how that coverage has played out over the past few weeks, and what some of the insights are that we can learn from for the way forward. This coverage mainly includes articles from various publications, websites, and blog posts in the English language. It does not include social media statistics from Tweeter or Facebook.  

An analysis of this media coverage featuring the key words “SDGs” and “developing countries” show that, over the past three months, more than 2,400 articles mentioned these two key words somewhere in the text of the articles. The analysis, using the Newsplus database, covers the period July 8-October 8. It shows that almost a quarter of that coverage (more than 600 entries) took place during the last week of September when the UN meetings were held. However, the second week of July, right before the summer break, was also active in terms of SDG-related coverage, signaling an important communications effort in the lead up to the UN September meetings.

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How do you access data on poverty?

Tariq Khokhar's picture

End Poverty Day tomorrow comes among heightened discussion about poverty’s causes, its measurement and what we can do to end it.   

The international extreme poverty line has been updated to $1.90/day, the recent Global Monitoring Report projects that the number of people living below this line will fall below 10% this year, and the Bank has just announced it’s stepping up efforts to boost data collection in the poorest countries, many of which suffer from “data deprivation”.

New Poverty Data Widget

These headlines are great, but how do you actually get to the data? If you want to quickly find how many people live below the international poverty line in a given country, you can use and embed this new widget that’s connected to the World Bank’s PovCalNet database:


4 more ways of accessing poverty data

Here are some other tools I find useful for accessing poverty data:

The three major challenges to ending extreme poverty

Marcio Cruz's picture
As the latest Global Monitoring Report (GMR) finds, the global poverty rate is expected to fall into the single digits for the first time in 2015 at 9.6 percent. While this is good news, when we look ahead, three major challenges stand out for development: the depth of remaining poverty, the unevenness in shared prosperity, and the persistent disparities in the non-income dimensions of development.

Poverty is falling faster among Africa’s female headed households

Dominique Van De Walle's picture
A sizeable number of households in Africa today have female heads.  Based on the latest Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), 26% of all households Africa-wide are headed by women. Although there are cross-country differences, the shares both of the population living in female headed households (FHHs) and of households headed by women, have been rising over time. The data show quite clearly that the probability that a woman aged 15 or older heads a household, controlling for her age, has been increasing since the early 1990s in all regions and across the entire age distribution.

Share your support today for End Poverty Day, October 17

Korina Lopez's picture

Share your support today for End Poverty Day, October 17

All day, every day, ending poverty is our collective goal. We all want to make sure that everyone has access to jobs, education, food, protection from violence – the list goes on.  A few weeks ago, global leaders and policymakers agreed on 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs or Global Goals). No. 1 is ending poverty. So it seems fortuitous that Oct. 17 is International Day for the Eradication of Poverty – a day dedicated to raising awareness about what each of us can do to solve this global issue. 

We’re asking everyone who wants to end poverty to show support. Change your profile pic on your social media channels to one of the eight End Poverty logos below. Share your vision of what must happen for a better world, whether it’s clean water or gender equality. Use the power of social media, using the hashtag #EndPoverty, to invite your family and friends to join the #EndPoverty movement. We have just the one world, let’s make it great.

In Lima, inequality debate focuses on women, youth, and taxes

Donna Barne's picture
Paraisopolis, São Paulo, Brazil. © Tuca Vieira


​Can we end extreme poverty in a world with extreme inequality? That question inspired a spirited debate in English and Spanish on Oct. 7, just ahead of the World Bank Group-IMF Annual Meetings in Lima, Peru, addressing corruption, taxation, discrimination against women, and the need to even the playing field for the younger generation.

Latin America’s experience with inequality was front and center at the live-streamed event, Inequality, Opportunity, and Prosperity, featuring World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, Ibero-American Secretary General Rebeca Grynspan, Oxfam International Chair Juan Alberto Fuentes Knight,  and moderated by CNN Español news anchor Patricia Janiot.

5 ways to understand poverty data

Tariq Khokhar's picture
The World Bank has just updated the international poverty line from $1.25 to $1.90 per day. There’s a lot to read about both the rationale behind, and the implications of this revision. A good place to start is this blog by our colleagues in the research department and the associated technical paper explaining the data, methodology and results.

We’ve also produced a series of “understanding poverty” video explainers that go into poverty lines, poverty measurement, purchasing power parities (PPPs), why we're updating the international poverty line to $1.90/day and some highlights from the newly released data. You can watch all 5 videos in the playlist below:
 
 

 

Real numbers that solve real problems: Measuring demand for infrastructure resources

Fernanda Ruiz Nunez's picture
If you’re reading this, you’ve used electricity today. Chances are you’ve also washed your face with clean water and traveled on a road to get to an office, a classroom, or a store. Those are basic infrastructure services, and it’s understandable if you take them for granted.

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