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Social Development

If You’re Watching the World Cup, You Don’t Want to Miss This

Michelle Pabalan's picture
Team Burundi, Great Lakes Peace Cup
“Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to unite in a way that little else does.”
- Nelson Mandela

Even though I didn’t grow up watching football, admittedly I’ve developed an interest in the sport during this month-long emotional World Cup soap opera. And like me, millions of people will be glued to their television sets for this Sunday’s finals match between Argentina and Germany. 
 
Above and beyond the superstars, the fans and controversies, I learned more about how this beautiful game is used to build communities, overcome social and cultural divides and advance peace. It seems sports have a way of changing the lives of people around the world - but what does this exactly look like?

Djibouti Invests in the First 1,000 Days

Homa-Zahra Fotouhi's picture
  Aude Guerrucci

When I visited one of the World Bank’s community sites for its new Social Safety Net program, I wanted to see the progress it had made since my first visit in November 2012.  In the first group session, I sat down with about 15 pregnant women—many of them pregnant for the first time—to hear a trained “role model mother” talk to them about the importance of rest, healthy eating, and breastfeeding. 

“Think Jobs”: What I Learned as a Participant in the World Bank’s “Think Jobs” Debate Competition

Delia Banda's picture
Delia Banda is a student of Zambia’s Copperbelt University. She recently won “Best Debater” during a televised debate series on jobs and unemployment that was sponsored by the World Bank Zambia Country Office.

June 27, 2014: This Week in #SouthAsiaDev

Mary Ongwen's picture
We've rounded up 20 tweets, posts, links, and +1's on South Asia-related development news, innovation and social good that caught our eye this week. Countries included: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal

Young Egyptians still Waiting for Economic Opportunities

Raghada Abdel Hamed's picture
 World Bank l Kim Eun Yeul

Education and employment are key problems for young people in Egypt, who say they need to see changes—in terms of more jobs and better education—in the present, not in the distant “future”, the word they always hear used in promises of change in Egypt.

Voices from Yemeni Civil Society

Web Team's picture
Civil society organizations in Yemen are among the most vibrant and dynamic in the Middle East and North Africa region. International experience has shown that they have a vital role to play in meeting the complex development challenges facing the country. One of the first steps is building a working partnership with the government. This selection of civil society voices outlines their approach to building that partnerships and meeting the challenges ahead.

President of the organization Fardos to empower women, Sameera Nasr Abdullah, addresses the value of having a space in which to build channels of communication with the government.
Sameera Nasr Abdullah

Nyerere’s Biggest Surprise: An Urban Tanzania

Jacques Morisset's picture

 Scott Wallace / World BankIf Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, the Father of the Nation, visited Dar es Salaam today, there is no doubt he would be surprised at what the city has morphed into since his time. From less than one million people in the early 1990s, Dar es Salaam’s population has grown at an average rate of 5.8 percent annually to reach 4.4 million people today, making it one of the fastest growing cities in the world. It is now estimated that the city will be home to over 10 million inhabitants by 2027.

The urbanization process in Tanzania is a tale of two cities, as illustrated by the recent growth of Dar es Salaam. At first glance, Dar es Salaam looks like a modern city with a panoramic skyline of tall new buildings. But this façade of the modern metropolis quickly gives way to sights of congestion in the city slums, highlighting the realities of poor urban planning and inadequate public services.

Beyond Stuff: Capacity as a Relational Concept

Richard Mallett's picture
What are we talking about when we talk about capacity? The answer should be straightforward, given that ideas of “capacity” and “capacity building” frame the way many of us think about – and do – development. But so often the response is fuzzy and unclear (kind of like “resilience”). This post tries to clarify things a little.

From “filling deficitsto “working politically”

When most people talk about capacity, they actually mean either “stuff” – resources and equipment – or hard skills in some technical discipline. This is the obvious starting point: without proper medical facilities or trained staff, how can a local health clinic do its job? Which is probably why so many capacity building programs try to fill deficits by giving stuff and providing technical training. But often the real problems confronting service providers have nothing to do with what's available in a tangible or technical sense – this might be a symptom, but it's not the root of the problem. So what do we then do in terms of thinking about capacity?

 

The Case for Regional Integration in the Middle East and North Africa

Aisha Irene Agily's picture


As the job market in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region becomes increasingly global and competitive, young people with varying degrees of training and education find themselves struggling to find work. With half its population of 355 million under the age of 25, MENA has the second youngest regional population in the world after sub-Saharan Africa. If this social, economic, and academic malaise continues, a high proportion of the MENA region’s youth will be unable to leave home, get married, and develop independent lives. 

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