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Social Development

Digital Youth Summit 2015: Tech Entrepreneurs from all over the world will gather in Peshawar Pakistan

Nicola Magri's picture
The IT Minister of the KP Province, the IT Permanent Secretary,
and the CEO of Peshawar 2.0 at the launch event of the
Digital Youth Summit 2015

Peshawar, Pakistan. One of the oldest cities of Asia and capital of the Province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), is a vibrant city, a melting pot of local and regional cultures that make it the city of hospitality. And in a few weeks, once again, the city will host the Digital Youth Summit which will take place on May 7-9, 2015.
 
Thanks to the joint efforts of the KP IT Board, the local youth-led organization Peshawar 2.0 and the World Bank, Peshawar will open its doors to the Tech Community from all over the world on May 7-9, 2015.
 
The Digital Youth Summit is the biggest tech conference of Pakistan that aims at “bringing together the next generation of digital entrepreneurs”, showcasing local startups and giving access to youngsters to income-generating opportunities based on Information and Communication Technologies.
 
Over the past two years the World Bank has been partnering with Peshawar 2.0 and the KP IT Board to explore new income-generating opportunities for the youth of KP. While talent and creativity are abundant, for many years the Province of KP has been severely affected by social conflicts and terrorist attacks that have deteriorated the investment climate, prevented the private sector for investing more in KP, led to high youth unemployment rate.

​​In this context of uncertainty, two “non-traditional” sectors have been identified as both attractive for youngsters and growing at global level while providing new opportunities: tech entrepreneurship and on-line work.
 
Thanks to its low entry barriers, Information and Communication Technologies provide the tools to easily take an idea to the global market, and quickly tackle challenges such as knowledge gaps or distance. A computer and an internet connection are all you need to access a wealth of open-learning material (the success of free portals such as Code.org, Khan Academy and Coursera are great examples) and, for instance, serve clients from different geographies as e-lancer (an e-lancer is an on-line freelancers – have a look at Elance.com trends).
 
Peshawar 2.0 and the KP IT Board have a clear vision: to take Peshawar to the next level and make it the city of Technology, Design and Arts, and the World Bank has been supporting their efforts. Peshawar 2.0 is a youth-led organization, they are working with the local government to build a movement of innovators and creators that embrace technology and encourage others to do so. The rationnel is very simple: a change of mindset is needed - venture out and use you talent to start your own business or serve clients from all over the world.

Fighting corruption in Lebanon: No more taboos? No more untouchables?

Ferid Belhaj's picture
Beirut

​Once an unmentionable endemic, corruption seems to have gained the honor of the limelight. It is now at the forefront of the public debate in Lebanon. Today, Lebanon’s political scene is watching in amazement as government ministers compete in a race to show how seriously each of them is taking the fight against corrupt practices. They are pushing ahead with an often controversial crackdown, publicly naming suspected felons.

Disability and Education: From Charity to Investment

Harry A. Patrinos's picture



Today, on World Autism Day, I’d like to highlight the impact of education on what persons with disabilities are capable of achieving.  More than one billion people – 15% of the world’s population – experience some form of disability. One-fifth of the estimated global total, up to 190 million people, encounter significant disabilities. Persons with disabilities are more likely to experience adverse socio-economic outcomes than persons without disabilities, such as less education, worse health outcomes, less employment, and higher poverty rates.Most persons with disabilities are in developing countries.

Inspirational stories from connect:ID – the journey to digital IDs for all

Mariana Dahan's picture
Today marks the end of the connect:ID conference, one of the most influential events in the United States, powered through an alliance with the world’s leading identity industry association.
 
courtesy of connect:ID

I was honored to be invited to speak on the role of identification in the post-2015 development agenda and the World Bank Group's Identification for Development (ID4D) initiative. There was great deal of excitement in the audience hearing about this global agenda.

The questions raised by the attendants touched upon ways of helping the least-developed, conflict-affected countries in the world, where the rates of birth registration and identification are amongst the lowest in the world (e.g. Liberia), to leapfrog to digital ID systems. Would the World Bank Group support such countries build their identification systems basically from scratch?

In this regard, it was interesting to hear the perspectives brought by a fellow panelist at the conference – Tariq Malik, the former chairman and the architect behind the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) of Pakistan. Starting almost from scratch, NADRA has massively enrolled the traditionally underregistered communities, including tribal groups, transgender populations and women, becoming a central player in a number of program areas. Under Tariq Malik’s leadership, NADRA has pioneered applications of biometric technology, successfully administering smart card programs for disaster relief programs and financial inclusion schemes for the underserved.

What is the secret of success in social inclusion? An example from Himachal Pradesh

Soumya Kapoor Mehta's picture
 
We started with a standard warm-up question as Gangi Devi, our first respondent, sat in anticipation. “Tell me a little bit about your society. What is distinctive about the Himachali way of life?” A smile lined up a face creased otherwise with wrinkles. “We are a peaceful society,” she said after thinking a little. “People here are good to one another, we stand by each other.” A person sitting next to her added for good measure, “We Himachalis are very innocent people.”
 
For those working in the development space in India, the state of  Himachal Pradesh, a small state ensconced in the Himalayas with a population of 7 million, is an outlier for many reasons, not least of which is Gangi Devi’s near puritan response.
 
Gangi Devi lives near a tourist centre close to Shimla, the state capital, which has seen increasing tourist footfall in recent years. Even as her community is debating the costs and benefits of increased activity around their village, Gangi Devi and her neighbours trust that the state government would keep people’s interests in mind and address adverse impacts, if any, of increased tourism on the environment.
 
Their belief in the government is supported by real actions. Himachal Pradesh is the first state in India to ban the use of plastic bags. Smoking in public spaces in the city of Shimla is punishable by law.
 
Governance in Himachal Pradesh looks doubly impressive when considered against an enviable development record

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