Syndicate content

Trade

The Doha Trade Round is Worth Fighting For

Otaviano Canuto's picture

November marks the eighth anniversary of the Doha Development Agenda– the first multilateral trade negotiation under the auspices of the World Trade Organization.  But what started as a real opportunity to help poor countries prosper through trade, for some it has now become a lost cause. But Doha doesn’t have to be a metaphor for failure. We can still save it and make it work. After all, if we can’t fix Doha, how can we hope to address much greater challenges that confront us, such as climate change?

How Will Changes in Globalization Impact South Asia?

Ejaz Ghani's picture

Globalization has accelerated global growth and global poverty reduction. But it has also raised concerns. The current global crisis may change globalization itself, as both developed and developing countries adjust to global imbalances that contributed to the crisis. Will these changes help or hinder economic recovery and growth in South Asia?

There are three models of globalization. These include (a) trade flows (exchange of goods), (b) capital flows (exchange of money), and (c) macroeconomic management. These three models of globalization may not be the same in the future. Changes in globalization could change the composition of trade flows, capital flows, and economic management, which in turn, could accelerate or restrain growth. So how will changes in these three models of globalization impact economic recovery and growth in South Asia?

South Asia as a region is peculiar. Its trade, capital flows, and economic management differ from other regions in how the region has globalized, although it must be mentioned that there is a lot of diversity within the region.

Domestic demand, net exports and Africa’s growth

Shanta Devarajan's picture

At the recent Africa Economic Conference, UN under-secretary general and executive secretary of UNECA, Abdoulie Janneh, said "[Africa’s] previous growth, while benefiting from improved macroeconomic management, was largely dependent on commodity exports and resources flows from outside the continent." 

Return of the Master

Michael Strauss's picture

One joy of working within the World Bank Group is the access to great lectures from brilliant and creative thinkers on issues of relevance to the global economy and international development.  Today, I had the opportunity to listen to Robert Skidelsky, acclaimed author of a three-volume biography of John Maynard Keynes, and, most recently, of Keynes: Return of the Master.  He provided an interesting picture of how Keynes – one of the primary forces behind the creation of the Wor

Watch Livestreaming of DM2009 Finalists

Tom Grubisich's picture

At 3:30 p.m. this afternoon (Washington time), we'll be interviewing 16 randomly selected finalists.

The interviews will be taking place today (11/10) from 3:45 to 5:30 p.m. Washington time. Be sure to check the live webcast.  If you miss the webcast, the interviews will be on the Development Marketplace YouTube channel, and also be archived on the webcast page.

The specific finalist projects for the webast are:

1.    Mapuche Forest Model Aims to Cut Greenhouse Gases and Avoid Deforestation in Chile.  Booth 15
2.    Empowering Indigenous Communities to Build Resilience Against Climate Change in Peru.  Booth 17
3.    Innovative Strategies for Sustainable Management of Communal Reserve in Peru.  Booth 23
4.    Rice Farmers Look to Fish Farming to Cushion the Impact of Climate Change in the Philippines.  Booth 30
5.    Mobilizing Community Journalists for Participatory Disaster Risk Management, Book 35
6.    Floating Gardens and Granaries Seen as Solution for Flood-Prone Communities in Laos.  Booth 37 (wild card)
7.    Carbon Credits to Help Smallholder Farmers Improve Income and Sustainability in Uganda.  Booth 47
8.    Recuperation of Water Systems on Vulnerable Pre-Hispanic Andean Terraces in Peru.  Booth 51
9.    Index-Based Rainfall Insurance to Help Plant More Productive Harvests in Indonesia.  Booth 55
10.    Strengthening Upstream-Downstream Linkages for Climate Change Adaptation in Nepal.  Both 61
11.    Reducing Risks for Biodiversity Conservation Using Adaptive Fire Management in Bolivia.  Booth 69
12.    Promoting Low-Cost, Flood-Resilient Shelters for Vulnerable Rural Villages in India.  Booth 72
13.    Strengthening Disaster Preparedness of Southern Leyte with SMS Technology.  Booth 79
14.    Rate-and-Shame Project Would Raise Media Pressure on Public Officials in Ukraine.  Booth 89
15.    Earth-Roofed Housing: Cheap, Sustainable Shelter to Face Desertification in Burkina Faso.  Booth 93
16.    Media Access and Education for Climate Change Adaptation and Risk Reduction in Bangladesh.  Booth 95

If you want to find out more about these projects, go to Slideshare or the DM Event Guide.

If you have questions or comments, drop a line here or on Twitter (hashtag #dm2009).  We'll be happy to pass your questions to the finalists.

Does South Asia Run the Risk of Rising Inflation?

Eliana Cardoso's picture

I am old enough to remember the days when Latin America was the land of inflation. Hyperinflation in Bolivia, Brazil and Argentina made the news in the 1980s and early 1990s. At that time, Asia was seen as immune to the Latin disease. Since then, much water has gone under the bridge. Inflation came under control in the majority of Latin American countries. Today the median inflation rate in South Asia is more than twice the size of the median inflation rate in Latin America and the Caribbean. (See chart below)

Should South Asia’s policymakers look at this information and wonder whether they are doing something wrong?

In general, the recipe for hyperinflation is the monetization of budget deficits in countries afflicted by political instability or conflict. Even if the threat of mega inflation is far removed from the South Asia scenarios, the combination of big budget deficits and loose monetary policy seems to be present in some countries of the region.

Incentives and Values in Conflict-Prone Countries

Eliana Cardoso's picture

One of the most extraordinary examples of the use of economic principles comes from the beginning of the 19th century, when England used to send a huge number of prisoners to Australia. The government originally paid the ship captain a pre-determined amount for each prisoner that boarded the ship, but half of them would die during the journey. In 1862, Edwin Chadwik, knowing that people respond to incentives, told the U.K. government to pay captains according to the number of prisoners that actually disembarked in Australia. With this adjustment, the survival rate increased from 50% to 98.5%.

This example illustrates how incentives can do wonders in some circumstances. Yet, human actions are not always guided by the same calculations made by a profit maximizing ship captain. Behavioral economists have emphasized that we respond to a deep ingrained sense of fairness. Culture and values are crucial in understanding human behavior and promoting healthy and stable societies.

Madagascar - Economic Update: Going Down...

Noro Andriamihaja's picture

If recent trends persisted during September, three new developments seem to indicate a deterioration in public finance and economic activities: (i)  the Government borrowed on the domestic financial market (about half of its monthly expenditures) for the first time since the beginning of the crisis; (ii) the exchange rate depreciated compared to the Euro and the USD over the past two weeks (down by 6 and 4% respectively); and (iii) international trade continued to decline (exports in volume, down by 62% in August compared to the same period a year ago).

Adaptation and Mitigation – The Difference

Tom Grubisich's picture

There are two ways to respond to climate change – adaptation and mitigation.  The responses are not an either/or.  Both are necessary.  Adaptation, as early as the short term, can cushion people and places against the impacts of extreme weather, including drought, heat waves, flooding, and rising sea levels.  Mitigation, over time, can slow down manmade global warming, which has been identified by many scientific studies as a major cause of extreme weather.


Pages